Topic: Legislative Action

Article State Budget

State budget adopted for 2021-22 boasts all-time high for education spending
Research Brief

Governor Newsom and the state Legislature came to an agreement on a $263 billion budget that reflects the state’s extraordinary surplus and billions from the latest round of federal stimulus funding from the American Rescue Plan. Spending for K-12 education totals $123.9 billion and is at an all-time high, including the largest ever allocation of Proposition 98 funding for schools and community colleges.

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Related Legislative Update – What’s in the largest ever state education budget?

Article State Budget

What’s in the largest ever state education budget?
An overview of California's historic investment coming in 2021-22

On July 9, Governor Newsom signed a historic education budget with an unprecedented investment in our students and schools.

The California Legislature voted on and passed identical budget bills (AB/SB 129) on June 28, after reaching agreement with the governor about most budget issues. The full budget is $263 billion, thanks to an extraordinary surplus and the latest round of federal stimulus funding from the American Rescue Plan. A few outstanding details will be finalized in trailer bills.

Article State Budget

Governor’s May Revision proposes highest level of education funding in California history
Legislative Update

California began the previous budget year with a looming recession forecasted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a projected $54 billion deficit. However, due mostly to the inequitable recovery of the stock market, profits from Silicon Valley, and high-income earners that did not lose their jobs, the state now has projected a $75.7 billion surplus.

Article

Tell California’s elected leaders – Invest in community colleges

California’s community colleges are critical to our students’ and our communities’ recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, without immediate action from Sacramento, most of our colleges are facing dire fiscal crises, threatening jobs and undermining our ability to meet the needs of our students and our communities.

Send a letter to California’s elected leaders: Time to invest in our community colleges!

Article Pay parity Part-time faculty

CFT seeks 85% adjunct teaching load, statewide path to pay parity
Union-sponsored legislation tackles long-standing adjunct issues

After last year’s heavily pandemic-impacted legislative session reduced the number of bills signed to its lowest number since 1967, the CFT is again taking up the adjunct cause on bills directed towards raising the part-time percentage cap on teaching in a single district, and in developing a path towards part-time/full-time pay parity.

Article

CFT introduces significant bills in the new legislative session
Legislative Update

The CFT is sponsoring or co-sponsoring numerous bills in the new legislative session. You can find them below with links to the bill language. 

MOVING BILLS

Community college part-time faculty reemployment
Assembly Bill 375
(Medina, D, Riverside) requires that negotiation on reemployment preference for part-time, temporary faculty assignments be based on the minimum standards not exceeding 80% to 85% of a full-time equivalent load, and would prohibit the community college district from restricting the terms of the negotiated agreement to less than that range, unless explicitly agreed upon by an individual part-time, temporary faculty member and the district. Sponsor

Article State Budget

CFT analyzes governor’s proposed education budget for 2021-22
Research Brief

Governor Newsom introduced his proposed $227 billion budget for 2021-22 on January 8. The proposed budget is starkly different from what lawmakers anticipated when they finalized the 2020-21 budget, largely because of much larger than expected tax receipts.

The General Fund budget is $164.5 billion, which is a 5.5% increase over 2020-21. The governor’s proposal devotes $14 billion to “early actions” that would provide various forms of relief due to the COVID-19 pandemic and includes $34 billion of “resiliency” proposals that rebuild the state’s reserves. The revenue projections result in much higher Proposition 98 funding than was expected. 

Article State Budget

Governor’s budget proposes increases for education, financial incentive to return to in-person classes
Legislative Update

Gov. Newsom released the annual January budget proposal for the 2021-22 budget year, totaling $227.2 billion on Friday, January 8. The budget is very different from what lawmakers anticipated six months ago, when the 2020-21 budget was finalized, thanks to much larger than expected tax receipts.  The proposal includes $34 billion allocated to reserves (including the Public School System Stabilization reserve) and as discretionary surplus funding.

Article State Budget

Governor proposes record education funding in state budget

To cap a tumultuous week, today Governor Newsom announced his state budget proposal for the coming year. Despite a struggling economy, and high unemployment, the top line budget numbers are hopeful for public education: a record $85.8 billion for K-14 schools, along with additional funding for teacher recruitment and training, and special education, among other programs. Additionally, the governor estimates that there will be an additional $6.7 billion from the federal government for K-12 as part of the most recent stimulus package.

Four new laws classified employees need to know about
From contracting COVID at work to personnel commission changes

Workers’ Comp classifies on-the-job COVID cases as occupational injuries

Senate Bill 1159 (Hill, D-San Mateo) directs the state Workers’ Compensation system to presume that an employee’s COVID-related illness is an occupational injury and therefore the worker eligible for Workers’ Comp benefits if specific criteria are met.

Article Workers Compensation Student debt Coronavirus

Legislative gains and losses for adjuncts in a time of COVID
Union scores expanded Workers’ Comp support, Student Borrower Bill of Rights

Just as the COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted public education, so too did it impact the California Legislature and CFT’s legislative goals.

What would normally have been a rigorous six-month period to discuss the state budget and legislation, was reduced to two virtual sessions, one running from May 4 to June 19, and the other from July 27 to August 31. This forced the Legislature, which was slated to hear and discuss some 2,390 bills, to shelve consideration of any bills not deemed related to the pandemic, wildfires, and affordable housing.

Article Coronavirus Workers Compensation

New Workers’ Comp law deems corona-related employee illness occupational injury
Quick Facts: SB 1159

On September 17, Governor Newsom signed SB 1159 (Hill, D-San Mateo), which directs the Workers’ Compensation system to presume that an employee’s illness related to coronavirus is an occupational injury and therefore eligible for Workers’ Compensation benefits if specified criteria are met. The bill creates a “rebuttable presumption” for healthcare workers, first responders, or workers on any worksite that has an outbreak of COVID-19.

Article Coronavirus

Governor signs 10 important bills to close unprecedented session
Legislative Update

August 31 marked the end of an unprecedented two-year legislative session, one in which the number of bills heard was pared down because of the COVID-19 pandemic and all hearings were held online.

Governor Newsom had until September 30 to sign or veto those bills that made it to his desk. Below is a summary of several CFT priority bills that the governor has either signed or are on his desk awaiting his action. Bills without an emergency clause and signed into law will take effect on January 1, 2021.

Article Student debt

Governor signs union-sponsored Student Borrower Bill of Rights
Sweeping legislation to protect student loan borrowers

Governor Newsom signed CFT co-sponsored AB 376, the Student Borrower Bill of Rights, on Friday, September 25. This critical piece of legislation will bring much-needed reforms to the student loan market and regulate the private sector companies that service both federal and private student loans for California borrowers.

Article Coronavirus State Budget

Pandemic leads to big cuts for education in May Revision
Legislative Update

Governor Newsom released the May Revision to the 2020-21 state budget on May 14. California began 2020 with a solid fiscal foundation. As the proposal notes, the state started the year with a “strong and diverse economy, historic reserves, and a structurally balanced budget.

The state had eliminated past budgetary debts and deferrals and was making extraordinary payments to reduce pension liabilities. In January, a budget surplus of $5.6 billion was projected for the 2020-21 fiscal year. Revenues through March were running $1.35 billion above projections.

Article Coronavirus State Budget

Uncertainty surrounds education budget for coming year
The one known — coronavirus has blown a giant hole in the state budget

The governor and the Legislature know the COVID-19 pandemic has blown a huge hole in the state budget, but they can’t easily project state revenues or the impact on Proposition 98 — the mechanism that provides K-12 schools and community colleges about 40 percent of the state’s General Fund.