Legislative Updates

Overview

Legislative Updates

The CFT Legislative Department introduces and lobbies for passage of union-sponsored bills. To communicate the progress of these and other priority bills, the department publishes regular Legislative Updates, which are posted below.  In addition, you may find legislative information in these places also. 

  • State Budget Briefs track and analyze education expenditures in the California budget.
  • Legislative Report is a comprehensive listing of our positions on all bills of interest to the CFT, but published less frequently.
  • Legislative Scorecard is published annually and tracks how legislators vote on bills and issues that matter to CFT members. The California Labor Federation also publishes an annual scorecard.
Article State Budget

What’s in the largest ever state education budget?
An overview of California's historic investment coming in 2021-22

On July 9, Governor Newsom signed a historic education budget with an unprecedented investment in our students and schools.

The California Legislature voted on and passed identical budget bills (AB/SB 129) on June 28, after reaching agreement with the governor about most budget issues. The full budget is $263 billion, thanks to an extraordinary surplus and the latest round of federal stimulus funding from the American Rescue Plan. A few outstanding details will be finalized in trailer bills.

Article State Budget

Governor’s May Revision proposes highest level of education funding in California history
Legislative Update

California began the previous budget year with a looming recession forecasted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a projected $54 billion deficit. However, due mostly to the inequitable recovery of the stock market, profits from Silicon Valley, and high-income earners that did not lose their jobs, the state now has projected a $75.7 billion surplus.

Article

CFT introduces significant bills in the new legislative session
Legislative Update

The CFT is sponsoring or co-sponsoring numerous bills in the new legislative session. You can find them below with links to the bill language. 

MOVING BILLS

Community college part-time faculty reemployment
Assembly Bill 375
(Medina, D, Riverside) requires that negotiation on reemployment preference for part-time, temporary faculty assignments be based on the minimum standards not exceeding 80% to 85% of a full-time equivalent load, and would prohibit the community college district from restricting the terms of the negotiated agreement to less than that range, unless explicitly agreed upon by an individual part-time, temporary faculty member and the district. Sponsor

Article Coronavirus

Governor extends COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave
Summary of changes in Senate Bill 95

On March 19, Governor Newsom extended COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave to provide California employees with two weeks of paid sick leave when they cannot work for reasons related to COVID-19. To qualify, you must work for an employer with 25 or more employees. This bill applies to both public and private sector workers. SB 95 takes effect on March 29, 2021, and will be applied retroactively to January 1, 2021. It expires on September 30, 2021.

What does Supplemental Paid Sick Leave provide?

COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave provides two weeks of fully paid leave, up to $511 per day. These are in addition to California Paid Sick Days and to any paid sick leave taken by a worker in 2020.

However, employers are not required to provide this in addition to paid sick leave under federal or local laws that already meet these requirements. So, if a locality guarantees workers two weeks of such leave, as does Los Angeles County, for example, then that worker is only guaranteed two weeks of leave.

Additionally, if an employer guarantees workers two weeks of such leave then that worker is only guaranteed two weeks of leave. Employers who are already giving this leave—and workers who already have it—do not get an extra two weeks.

How can you use this paid sick leave?

SB 95 provides paid leave if you cannot work or telework because:

  • You are subject to a quarantine or isolation order due to COVID-19.
  • You were advised by a healthcare provider to quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19.
  • You are attending an appointment to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • You are recovering from symptoms of a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • You are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and seeking a medical diagnosis.
  • You are caring for a family member who has COVID-19, or who has been advised to self-quarantine.
  • You are caring for a child whose school or place of care is closed or otherwise unavailable for reasons related to COVID-19 on the premises.

When can you take this paid sick leave?

Although it takes effect on March 29, 2021, it applies retroactively to January 1, 2021. If you already took leave in 2021 for COVID-19, you can ask your employer to pay you for the time you were out of work, up to 2 weeks. Your employer should pay you in your next pay period. COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave will expire on September 30, 2021.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Michael Young Legislative Representative   

Telephone (916) 696-0563

Download the Legislative Update

Article State Budget

Governor’s budget proposes increases for education, financial incentive to return to in-person classes
Legislative Update

Gov. Newsom released the annual January budget proposal for the 2021-22 budget year, totaling $227.2 billion on Friday, January 8. The budget is very different from what lawmakers anticipated six months ago, when the 2020-21 budget was finalized, thanks to much larger than expected tax receipts.  The proposal includes $34 billion allocated to reserves (including the Public School System Stabilization reserve) and as discretionary surplus funding.

Article State Budget

Legislative Analyst forecasts state revenue windfall
Preliminary state budget outlook for 2021-22

Each November, the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) is tasked with providing the state Legislature with forecasting of the state’s revenue and budget constraints. Those numbers have just been released to provide a starting point for what to expect in budget negotiations for the California 2021-22 state budget.