Newsroom

California Teacher CFT 100

The March for California’s Future: We walked the valley with a message of hope and justice
A capsule summary: 365 miles, 48 days, rallying from town to town

In the CFT-organized March for California’s Future, six “core marchers” walked 365 miles from Bakersfield to Sacramento over the course of 48 days. Putting their lives on hold, they braved the elements, sleeping in churches, schools, and RV parks.

Throughout California’s great Central Valley — home to people who work the fields as well as legislators elected in small towns who demand budget cuts and oppose tax increases — the marchers talked to people and listened to personal stories of economic hardship.

Article

The March for California’s Future

Start of the next step in the Fight for California’s Future

April 21, 2010, Sacramento—With a huge, boisterous crowd estimated at 7500 joining feet with the six core marchers who walked more than 300 miles from Bakersfield over the previous forty eight days, the CFT-led March for California’s Future arrived in front of the state Capitol on schedule at 3 pm on April 21.

Its purpose is to draw public attention to three urgent ideas:

Article

Week 2: March for California’s Future
Walking through the crisis in the Valley

TULARE, CA (3/13/10) — Through its first week, the March for California’s Future passed through the small farm worker towns of the southern San Joaquin Valley – McFarland, Delano, Pixley and Tulare. For one marcher, Jenn Laskin, these communities remind her of Watsonville, where she teaches humanities and English, and food justice in the school garden, at Renaissance Continuation High School.

Article
Week 1: March for California’s Future

Week 1: March for California’s Future
March heads for Sacramento from Bakersfield

SHAFTER, CA (3/6/10) – As the March for California’s Future left Bakersfield and headed up the San Joaquin Valley toward Sacramento, community college instructor Jim Miller was still energized by the March 4 Day of Action to save public education. That day students, teachers and community activists had demonstrated and protested around the state, with the largest rally in Los Angeles. The marchers stepped out on the road the following day, after a similar rally in Bakersfield.

Article

Labor Education 101 conference focuses on solidarity, curricula
Conference receives high marks from attendees

They learned about the best practices in the field. They heard from a legislator about the prospects for progressive legislation in post-recall Sacramento. And they enjoyed a personal visit from beyond the grave of dockworker and union hero Harry Bridges, leader of the longshoreman’s union and the 1934 San Francisco General strike, courtesy of actor Ian Ruskin, who performed his acclaimed solo show, From Wharf Rats To Lords of the Docks.

Article

Teachers like new “New Deal” Conference

The second annual Education and Labor Collaborative conference was held at Antioch University/Los Angeles for a labor film fest on the Friday evening of April 24, and at United Teachers Los Angeles headquarters all day Saturday. About 50 people attended the film show, and 75 attended the conference, about 25 of whom were UTLA members who received salary point credit for attending. Last year’s conference was held at United Federation of Teachers in New York.