In the News Archive: March 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS 

State lawmakers call for deeper regulation of charter schools
LA School Report | March 26, 2015
Four Democratic California lawmakers joined forces yesterday to promote new bills aimed at creating more stringent regulation of the state’s charter schools.

McGuire’s bipartisan career and job skills bill passes Senate Education Committee
Lake County News | March 26, 2015
Sen. Mike McGuire was joined by teachers, manufacturers, the farm bureau, and members of the building trades Wednesday morning when his bi-partisan legislation that would expand career and job skills in public middle and high schools advanced through the Senate Education Committee with a 7-0 vote.

Teachers support crackdown on charter schools through legislation
Breitbart News | March 26, 2015
Democrats in the California State Assembly, prodded along by their financial backers at the California Teachers Association, California Federation of Teachers, and California Labor Federation, announced their goal on Wednesday of gutting the state’s charter school system. Their strategy: force charter schools to operate as non-profit organizations.

California teachers fight to save their union and the schools
People’s World | March 25, 2015
Unionized California teachers are among the many categories of workers nationwide whose unions are under attack by anti-labor lawmakers and judges seeking to kill unions by draining them of their financial lifeblood. The teachers are saying, however, that they won't shrink from the fight to preserve their union's right to collect fees for the representation services it provides and that they will continue their ongoing fight for quality education for everyone.

California teachers unions promote charter school bills
Sacramento Bee | March 25, 2015
California’s politically potent teachers unions are promoting bills requiring charter schools to hold open meetings and to consider all applicants while cracking down on for-profit charter operators.

Southern California legislators call for charter school reform
San Bernardino County Sun | March 25, 2015
California legislators took to the steps of the State Capitol on Wednesday to call for reform of the state’s charter school law, including requiring them to be run as non-profits.

Jacque Robinson continues historic run for City of Pasadena Mayor
Los Angeles Sentinel | March 12, 2015
Jacque Robinson became one of the youngest elected officials in the history of the City of Pasadena when she won her City Council race at the age of 28, and Tuesday March 10th she pushed fellow council member Terry Tornek into an April 21st runoff to become the second Black woman to serve as Mayor of Pasadena. 

California’s public education charade
U-T San Diego | March 12, 2015
The importance of a decent education to success in life has never been more plain. This is why Gov. Jerry Brown has spoken of the urgency of California doing a better job in educating millions of minority students who struggle with English and who are much more prone to drop out with few job skills.

National Adjunct Action Day
The Mesa Press | March 10, 2015
National Adjunct Action Day made its way to San Diego Mesa College on Feb. 25 as staff, students, faculty, and supporters all rallied up to speak out about the growing adjunct crisis in America.

Negotiate now or face a strike, say L.A. teachers
People’s World | March 3, 2015
Red shirts filled Grant Park last Thursday, across the street from City Hall here, in a rally of educators, students, and parents. "District greed has got to go! Call the school board and let them know," people at the rally chanted. 


EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

Despite state mediator, LAUSD and teachers still $774 million and an evaluation system apart
LA Daily News | March 26, 2015
A referee from California’s top labor authority proved little help Thursday in the fray between Los Angeles’ school district and teachers union.

“We have a clearer pathway for student learning” with the Common Core
EdSource | March 26, 2015
Gabriela Mafi, superintendent of the Garden Grove Unified School District, is a Latina raised in urban Los Angeles. She is a first-generation college graduate who received her master’s and doctoral degrees in Urban Educational Leadership from the University of Southern California. She has been superintendent in Garden Grove, in northern Orange County, since the summer of 2013, after a career that included serving as a K-12 teacher, an adjunct college professor, and an assistant superintendent of secondary education.

Efforts to expand California university systems are growing
LA Times | March 25, 2015
The death last week of former University of California system president and UC Irvine chancellor Jack W. Peltason at 91 elicited warm memories of the modest political scientist who achieved high positions in American academia without losing his sense of humor. He also was known for his role in helping to build new university campuses from scratch and growing them to maturity.

We need resources and time ‘to show that we can improve’
EdSource | March 25, 2015
Craig Wheaton, superintendent of the Visalia Unified School District, talked with EdSource about some of the challenges and encouraging signs in his district. The following are excerpts from the interview.

Cal State efficiencies save millions, but state funding still sought
LA Times | March 25, 2015
Smaller budgets and increased numbers of students are forcing California State University campuses to take far-reaching cost-cutting measures that are saving millions of dollars on technology, energy and operations, officials said Wednesday.

Overhaul urged to aid special education in California
Education Week | March 24, 2015
Members of a task force that spent two years studying special education in California used their final report to recommend sweeping changes to the state's entire pre-K-12 system in hopes of improving achievement for students with disabilities.

CSU administrators' pay gains outpace those for faculty, report says
LA Times | March 24, 2015
California State University administrators made significant gains in hiring and compensation over the last decade while faculty lost ground or failed to keep pace in both areas, according to a report released Tuesday by the California Faculty Assn.

New studies find that, for teachers, experience really does matter
Education Week | March 24, 2015
The notion that teachers improve over their first three or so years in the classroom and plateau thereafter is deeply ingrained in K-12 policy discussions, coming up in debate after debate about pay, professional development, and teacher seniority, among other topics.

San Francisco teachers' union describes 'great distress' among members
National Catholic Reporter | March 24, 2015
The executive board of the teachers' union representing the San Francisco archdiocese's four high schools sent a letter describing "great distress" and "significant division, discontent, doubt and fear" among its members to administrators of three of the four schools.*

Dates for new Common Core assessments vary by district
EdSource | March 23, 2015
Between now and mid-June, approximately 3.2 million California students will take new online tests aligned with the Common Core State Standards, marking a new era in California’s multi-decade efforts to establish an accountability system to assess student performance.

Proposition 30 closes spending gap between state and nation
EdSource | March 23, 2015
Revenue from temporary taxes from Proposition 30 has closed the K-12 spending gap between California and the national average by more than 60 percent, according to data released Monday by the California Budget and Policy Center, a nonprofit research organization.

What do Snoop Dogg and CalSTRS have in common?
Chief Investment Officer | March 13, 2015
The latest environmental, social, and governance-based divestment campaign has arisen not from college students, but rather the West Coast rapper Snoop Dogg.

Unraveling the church ban on gay sex
New York Times | March 12, 2015
Last month, Salvatore Cordileone, the archbishop of San Francisco, made controversial changes to a handbook for Catholic high school teachers in his jurisdiction. The changes included morals clauses, one of which forbids those teachers from publicly endorsing homosexual behavior. There are plausible legal and educational objections to this move. But there is a deeper issue, one that raises fundamental questions about Catholic teachings on homosexuality and other sexual matters.

Staten Island judge allows suit on teacher tenure to proceed
New York Times | March 12, 2015
Opponents of New York State’s teacher tenure laws won a small but important victory on Thursday, when a Staten Island judge allowed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of those rules to move forward. 

California gives extra year to adjust to Common Core tests
ABC News | March 12, 2015
California is giving schools at least one year to breathe easy before they are held accountable for results on new tests aligned to the Common Core standards. 

Strike chicken between LAUSD, UTLA; Pi Day at Millikan
LA School Report | March 12, 2015
Appearing before the LA Unified school board on Tuesday to respond to a district plan to send layoff notices to over 600 employees, UTLA President Alex Caputo-Pearl suggested that he sees a conspiratorial move by the board in response to UTLA’s seeking a new contract while threatening to strike. 

How to fix No Child Left Behind
EdSource | March 12, 2015
Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s commentary for EdSource last month, called “How Not to Fix No Child Left Behind,” consisted for the most part of mushy platitudes that must be measured against the realities of his actions over the past six years. 

Potential exists for ‘much richer and in-depth math experience’
EdSource | March 12, 2015
Math teacher Timothy Smith earned a 2014 California Teacher of the Year award and was chosen by Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson to be the state’s nominee for the National Teacher of the Year award. 

Public schools see windfall after $1-million lotto prize goes unclaimed
LA Times | March 12, 2015
California public schools just won the lottery -- sort of. The Powerball winner seen above failed to claim his $1-million prize by 5 p.m. Thursday, officials said. 

LAUSD approves sending layoff recommendations
NBC Southern California | March 11, 2015
The Los Angeles Unified School District board approved a recommendation Tuesday that will authorize sending layoff warning notices to 609 employees by March 15. The decision comes in the wake of a report indicating the school district is facing a nearly $160 million deficit. 

LAUSD doesn’t want to be held accountable for Common Core performance, but state may decide otherwise
LA Daily News | March 11, 2015
The California Board of Education was expected to decide Wednesday whether schools should be held accountable on the state’s performance index for student results in the new Common Core-aligned assessments. 

California suspends school accountability on Common Core
Christian Science Monitor | March 11, 2015
The California Board of Education suspended the state's school accountability system on Wednesday for one year to give teachers and students time to adjust to new standardized tests aligned with Common Core standards. 

California suspends school ratings for first year of Common Core test
KQED | March 11, 2015
Across California, kids this week are hunkering down over new standardized tests. In the future, these tests will help determine how we decide which schools are good and which aren’t. But this year schools and students are getting a break. 

'Vergara' decision emboldens state GOP
U-T San Diego | March 9, 2015
The late American Federation of Teachers President Al Shanker reputedly said that he'll start representing the interests of children “when schoolchildren start paying union dues.” The veracity of the quotation still is in dispute, but it often is repeated because it highlights a truth about teachers’ unions. 

Nevius: Catholic Church can’t win fight it’s picking with S.F.
San Francisco Chronicle | March 9, 2015
Supervisor Mark Farrell tried to be reasonable. Maybe that’s where he went wrong. At last week’s Board of Supervisors meeting, Farrell introduced a resolution pretty much to urge San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone to back off on the “morality clauses” he’s got his mind set on for local Catholic school teacher labor contracts and handbooks. 

Activists stage protest against archdiocese of San Francisco on International Women's Day
NBC Bay Area | March 9, 2015
Local activists have staged a protest against the Archdiocese of San Francisco Sunday afternoon demanding gender equality, as the world celebrated International Women's Day. 

What’s next for City College of San Francisco?
SF Gate | March 8, 2015
City College of San Francisco has endured — and survived — a near-lethal challenge from the commission that tried to revoke its accreditation and shut down California’s largest public school. 

Hand scorers sought for online Common Core tests
EdSource | March 8, 2015
As millions of students prepare, for the first time, to take a battery of assessments aligned with the Common Core using computers, at least portions of the tests will have to be scored the old-fashioned way: by humans. 

S.F. city attorney argues against archbishop’s morality clauses
SF Gate | March 6, 2015
San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera, seldom one to stand back from a scrap, has blasted his local archbishop’s attempt to insert strict morality clauses into rules governing Catholic high school teachers. 

 

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In the News Archive: February 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS 

UTLA says money is there for teachers; LA Unified not so sure
LA School Report | Feb. 19, 2015
Fueling the impasse announced yesterday between the teachers union, UTLA, and LA Unified is a dispute over so-called “unaccounted” sources of money that the teachers union says could be used for raises and other demands. 

Judgment Day
Slate | Feb. 19, 2015
On Tuesday evening, liberal Catholics in San Francisco announced a vigil to protest new sexual-conduct rules for teachers in the city’s Catholic schools. “We stand with teachers,” they declared, “in rejecting morality clauses that impede their freedom, including the right to choose who to love and marry and how to plan a family.”  

Accreditor still has final say over fate of City College of San Francisco
Chronicle of Higher Education | Feb. 19, 2015
On paper San Francisco’s city attorney won a victory on Tuesday in his lawsuit against the accreditor that oversees City College of San Francisco.  

Judge orders accreditor to redo portion of San Francisco college review
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court injunction released Wednesday would allow -- but not force -- City College of San Francisco to seek a somewhat narrow reconsideration of a private commission's decision to revoke its accreditation.  

City College will defend its accreditation following court injunction
The San Francisco Appeal | Feb. 18, 2015
The chancellor of City College of San Francisco said tonight that the college will take up the opportunity provided by a court injunction to seek reconsideration of a regional commission’s decision to revoke its accreditation.  

Middle ground remains elusive in San Francisco Catholic high school handbook fight
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 17, 2015
The clash over Catholic high school faculty handbooks and teacher contracts in the San Francisco Bay Area seems to be a standoff between those who embrace Catholic teaching as settled and unchanging and those who insist it is evolving and must do so.  

This year, billionaire Eli Broad won’t pay the $1 million prize for inner city school districts
Jewish Business News | Feb. 9, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad, 81, is refusing to pay out a $1 million prize which was promised to the best inner city school systems, arguing the schools are not improving, at least not as fast as they should, the LA Times reported. In fact, Broad is not sure it pays to support any of the traditional school systems.  

Hangovers continue from 1999-2000 pension binge
U-T San Diego | Feb. 9, 2015
Awful decisions involving public employee retirement benefits made during the Legislature’s 1999-2000 session continue to haunt California. The deluge began with the September 1999 enactment of a 50 percent retroactive increase in pensions of most state employees. The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, astonishingly, told lawmakers this giveaway would have little or no long-term cost because the stock market boom would never end. 

Broad Foundation suspends $1-million prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 8, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad has suspended a coveted, $1-million prize to honor the best urban school systems out of concern that they are failing to improve quickly enough. And, associates say, he's no longer certain that he wants to reward traditional school districts at all. 

AFT president Weingarten visits town to give LA teachers a boost
LA School Report | Feb. 5, 2015
As the teachers union’s negotiations with LA Unified drag on, one of the nation’s leading voices for teachers appeared at an event last night hosted by district board member Steve Zimmer and made a strong case for union activity and solidarity.

Broad Foundation suspends public school prize, awards charter school
Breitbart News | Feb. 4, 2015
The Broad Foundation, disappointed with the lack of progress in urban school districts, has suspended its $1 million scholarship prize. The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation said “sluggish academic results from the largest urban school districts in the country” caused the foundation to put the program on hold.

S.F. archbishop’s morality clauses run counter to pope’s message
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 4, 2015
While a forward-thinking pope is changing the image of the Catholic Church by preaching compassion in Google hangouts, his archbishop in San Francisco is going in a different direction, emphasizing sexual limitations in employee morality clauses. 

Broad suspends prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 3, 2015
The locally based Broad Foundation has suspended a widely recognized prize for top-performing urban school systems. 

Landmark court decision puts students' needs first
Reason.com | Feb. 1, 2015
"Being a kid in the California system right now is a lot like the lottery," says Julia Macias, a ninth grader who lives in California's San Fernando Valley. "You might get an amazing teacher one year and then a not so amazing teacher and you see your scores are reflected upon that." 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS 

San Francisco archbishop defends strict teacher morality code
CBS News | Feb. 20, 2015
The archbishop of San Francisco sent a letter to California lawmakers on Thursday asking them to respect his right to hire people who uphold Catholic teachings. 

Common Core lessons aim to close persistent achievement gap
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Michelle Rodriguez, assistant superintendent of the Santa Ana School District, is convinced that the new Common Core State Standards can help narrow California’s achievement gap. For all too many decades, that troubling disparity has been marked by lower test scores and higher dropout rates for African-American, Latino and low-income students, and students who are still learning English. 

S.F. archbishop fires back at lawmaker critics
SF Gate | Feb. 19, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone fired back Thursday at state lawmakers who characterized as intolerant and possibly illegal his effort to have teachers at four Catholic high schools sign a labor contract declaring their opposition to same-sex unions, abortion and contraception. 

California task force urges reform of special education funding
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Federal and state funding rates for special education would be equalized across California and new special education teachers would be authorized to teach general education if draft recommendations from a task force presented on Wednesday are implemented. 

Under San Francisco's new handbook language, could gay marriage lead to dismissal?
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 19, 2015
If a teacher's same-sex marriage becomes public knowledge, will he or she be dismissed as an employee of a Catholic high school owned and operated by the San Francisco archdiocese? 

‘Constitutional crisis’ declared as Los Angeles Unified lawyers defend teacher evaluation system
LA Daily News | Feb. 18, 2015
Los Angeles Unified lawyers argued this week that a “constitutional crisis” should allow them to keep a controversial new teacher evaluation system without the consent of its 35,000-member teachers union. 

Archbishop on crash course with S.F., state
SF Gate | Feb. 18, 2015
San Francisco’s archbishop is trying to make its Catholic schools more Catholic, but city and state officials are poised to push back, saying any effort to discriminate against employees will be met with legal action. 

Hundreds protest morality clause for teachers proposed by SF Archbishop
ABC 7 News | Feb. 18, 2015
There's backlash against San Francisco's Catholic archbishop and his controversial move to make teachers sign morality clauses critical of same-sex marriage and birth control, among other things. 

Head Start programs in California rebound as funding increases
EdSource | Feb. 18, 2015
Two years ago, federally funded early learning providers in California were forced to reduce the available slots for 6,000 incoming students after a gridlocked Congress could not agree on how to reduce the deficit, triggering a round of automatic spending cuts to Head Start and other federal programs across the nation. 

Tuition hike put on hold for UC summer school
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
Students planning to attend UC's upcoming summer school sessions got a much welcome reprieve Wednesday from tuition increases that could have been as large as 5%. 

Lawmakers urge S.F. archbishop to withdraw teacher morality clauses
LA Times | Feb. 17, 2015
Eight state lawmakers on Tuesday urged San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone to withdraw the "morality clauses" he unveiled this month in a handbook for high school teachers, and to reverse his intention to redefine teachers as "ministers" in their employment contracts. 

California could lose millions in funding, report states
EdSource | Feb. 15, 2015
The White House released a report that shows that school districts with large numbers of low-income students, including Los Angeles, Fresno and San Diego, stand to lose millions of dollars in federal funding under the House version of amendments to the nation’s education law. 

California schools utilizing Common Core coaches
Education Dive | Feb. 13, 2015
To ease the transition to Common Core, some California districts are putting instructional coaches in classrooms to help teachers modify their lessons for the new standards. 

S.F. archbishop's imposition of morality clause at schools outrages many
LA Times | Feb. 12, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone sparked a protest last summer when he ignored pleas from public officials to cancel his plans to march in Washington, D.C., against same-sex marriage. 

Lawmakers skeptical of Brown’s facility funding plan
Cabinet Report | Feb. 12, 2015
Lawmakers on Wednesday expressed skepticism of Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to reduce the state's role in building and maintaining schools by pushing the bulk of the financial burden onto local districts and their communities. 

Jerrod Bradley: Common Core math is worth the effort
Fresno Bee | Feb. 12, 2015
California schools are actively working toward the successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards and Smarter Balanced assessments. This is a multiyear effort and represents an important step toward better preparing students for what comes after high school. 

Teachers protest as San Francisco archbishop insists schools uphold Catholic teaching on marriage
Life Site | Feb. 11, 2015
The Catholic archbishop of San Francisco is facing resistance to his efforts to protect the students in diocesan high schools from the secular wave of society, including from some teachers, parents, and students. 

S.F. schools superintendent to receive 27% pay raise
SF Gate | Feb. 11, 2015
San Francisco Unified School District Superintendent Richard Carranza will see an extra $65,000 in his annual paycheck — a 27 percent raise granted unanimously by the school board Tuesday night. 

Educators, builders oppose Brown's plan to stop state borrowing to pay for schools
Ventura County Star | Feb. 11, 2015
Lawmakers, educators and representatives of the homebuilding industry pushed back Wednesday against Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to end a long-standing state policy of issuing bonds to help pay for school construction. 

Charter school enrollment surges
San Jose Mercury News | Feb. 11, 2015
Statewide enrollment in charter schools grew 7 percent this school year, so that more than one in 12 California public school students attends a charter school, according to an advocacy group's report released Wednesday. 

Archbishop Cordileone is a true shepherd of Catholic schools
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 11, 2015
Much ado has been made about Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s efforts to ensure that Catholic schoolteachers model moral behavior. If the mission of Catholic schools is to form students both in knowledge and in faith, then he is simply doing his job to ensure that teachers have the necessary qualifications for religious education. 

Autism advocacy group states vaccination link unfounded
EdSource | Feb. 10, 2015
In the midst of a nationwide measles outbreak tied to unvaccinated children and adults in California, the nation’s leading autism advocacy group has changed its position and now clearly states there is no link between vaccinations and autism. 

Common Core and California’s economic success
Fox and Hounds | Feb. 9, 2015
California is on its way to becoming the world’s seventh-largest economy. Driving this growth is our world leading high technology businesses alongside our longtime strong entertainment, agriculture and energy sectors. Sustaining California’s economic growth will require a skilled workforce to meet the demands of our evolving, expanding economy. Unfortunately, there is a significant skilled workforce shortage in our state. The disconnect between workers and job readiness has challenged employers in Kern County and all of California.

Teacher directive prompts vigil at San Francisco cathedral
SF Gate | Feb. 6, 2015
About 100 people attended a vigil outside the Roman Catholic cathedral in San Francisco on Friday to protest the local archbishop's move to require teachers at four Catholic high schools to lead their public lives inside the classroom and out in accordance with church teachings on homosexuality, birth control and other hot-button issues.

New lawmakers rise instantly to run committees on children’s policies
EdSource | Feb. 5
In a sign of how much term limits are affecting the legislative process in California, freshman legislators have been appointed to chair four out of six key committees handling education and children’s issues – even though they had no prior experience as lawmakers in the state Capitol.

How not to fix No Child Left Behind
EdSource | Feb. 5
Mattilyn Gonzalez is a thriving student, who has earned straight A’s and a spot in an accelerated learning program at her middle school. Her parents, Orlando and Celine Gonzalez, trace that success back to a strong preschool program – so they were determined that their second daughter, Arianna, would get the same opportunities.

The college loan bombshell hidden in the budget
Politico | Feb. 5, 2015
In obscure data tables buried deep in its 2016 budget proposal, the Obama administration revealed this week that its student loan program had a $21.8 billion shortfall last year, apparently the largest ever recorded for any government credit program.

California lawmakers aim to limit vaccine exemptions
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
California lawmakers proposed legislation Wednesday that would require parents to vaccinate all school children unless a child's health is in danger, joining only two other states with such stringent restrictions.

Analysis: In California, charter school students most likely to be unvaccinated
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
Charter and private school students in California are much more likely to have vaccine exemptions than students enrolled in a regular district schools, according to an analysis by a researcher at the University of Maryland in College Park.

SF archdiocese requiring educators to publicly align with Catholic teaching
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 5, 2015
The Archdiocese of San Francisco is strengthening language in its faculty contract and handbook that requires high school educators to uphold Catholic teachings in their professional and public lives.

Disney measles outbreak: State lawmakers propose ditching 'personal' vaccine exemption
KPCC | Feb. 4, 2015
With California dealing with the measles outbreak that began at the Anaheim Disney theme parks, three state lawmakers Wednesday proposed ditching the law that allows parents to not vaccinate their children based on "personal belief."

What will bachelor's degrees from community colleges be worth?
LA Times | Feb. 4, 2015
When 15 California community colleges received preliminary approval to offer four-year degrees recently, officials touted the move as a way to provide highly trained workers at a lower cost, especially for technical jobs in fields such as medicine and dentistry.

Classroom coaches critical as teachers shift to Common Core
EdSource | Feb. 4, 2015
To break down the isolation that many teachers experience in their classrooms, California schools are using instructional coaches as a key tool to help teachers adapt their instruction to implement the Common Core standards in math and English language arts.

Spotlight on Jeb Bush's K-12 group as new chief takes over
Education Week | Feb. 3, 2015
Jeb Bush's decision to turn over leadership of the prominent K-12 organization he founded to Condoleezza Rice as he mulls a White House bid could signal a new phase for the Foundation for Excellence in Education—and for a broader network of advocacy groups seeking to challenge what they view as the status quo in education.

National magazine, Reason, has a look at the Vergara case
LA School Report | Feb. 3, 2015
With the eyes of the educational world closely watching the Vergara v. California case as it awaits an appeal ruling, the libertarian-tilted publication Reason magazine is the latest national media organization to profile the issue.

API should be replaced, state committee recommends
EdSource | Feb. 3, 2015
A state advisory committee that spent more than two years trying to find a way to rejigger the Academic Performance Index is now recommending moving away from that single number in favor of a more comprehensive system allowing for a broader picture of school effectiveness.

Common Core enters arena of presidential politics
EdSource | Feb. 2, 2015
With the growing certainty that Jeb Bush will be a candidate in the 2016 presidential campaign, his support for the Common Core State Standards guarantees that the standards being implemented in 43 states will be drawn into the whirlpool of presidential politics.

Easier path from community college to Cal State, report says
LA Times | Feb. 2, 2015
The number of community college students who earned degrees that streamline entry into Cal State grew significantly last year, but too many students still are unaware of the transfer program, according to a report released Monday.

CCSF special trustee retires unexpectedly
SF Gate | Feb. 1, 2015
The state-appointed “special trustee with extraordinary powers” who replaced the elected Board of Trustees at City College of San Francisco in 2013 is abruptly retiring as the huge school appears to have escaped a closure threat, for now.

CCSF special trustee to retire; replacement to be named by end of month
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 1, 2015
Robert Agrella, the special trustee tasked in 2013 with saving City College of San Francisco from losing its accreditation, will retire just weeks after the embattled school was given two more years to meet accrediting requirements.

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: April 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS

Influential Catholics call for removal of San Francisco archbishop in full-page ad
National Catholic Reporter | April 16, 2015
A powerful cross-section of Catholics in the San Francisco archdiocese is asking Pope Francis to replace Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone, saying the archbishop has “fostered an atmosphere of division and intolerance.”

Marten’s stand on school testing isn’t constructive
U-T San Diego | April 16, 2015
San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten has built up plenty of good will in her two years on the job. She’s very smart, has a vision for what she wants to accomplish and seems unfazed by the political pressures she faces running a big-city school district.

StudentsFirst sues teachers unions over dues
Capital & Main | April 15, 2015
The latest legal assault on the right of the state’s public-sector unions to collect dues was filed in Los Angeles earlier this month by StudentsFirst, the Sacramento-based, national school-privatization organization. 

Politicizing investments hurts pensioners, taxpayers
OC Register | April 15, 2015
Politicians love to spend other people’s money. This axiom is no less true when it comes to investing other people’s money. California’s pension funds have a long history of political activism – to the detriment of the employees and retirees whose benefits are paid, in large part, from pension investment returns, and the taxpayers who are forced to pick up the slack when the politically motivated investments underperform. 

CalSTRS board trustees elected to serve another four-year term
PRWeb | April 14, 2015
The California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) yesterday announced the election of the three member-representatives to the CalSTRS governing board. The members will each serve a four-year term, which begins January 1, 2016. 

Unions critical of poll on teachers tenure and seniority-based layoffs
LA Times | April 13, 2015
Teachers unions expressed concern Monday over the results of a poll indicating that California voters are critical of current job protections provided to instructors in public schools.

New poll challenges union stance on tenure
Education Week | April 13, 2015
California's teacher unions got yet another wake-up call over the weekend with the release of the USC/Dornsife poll by the Los Angeles Times. 

Even with charter support, LA teachers union faces uphill battle
Watchdog Arena | April 10, 2015
As California teachers unions develop strategies to reverse the trend in lagging membership, ongoing struggles bring the spotlight back to the school choice debate. With membership declining, charter organizations become stronger. To the union leadership, the competition means less support for its political activities. 

Teachers balk at paying for politics
OC Register | April 9, 2015
Bhavini Bhakta spent 10 years as an elementary school teacher, for the Monrovia Unified School District and the Arcadia Unified School District. She was laid off five times in the space of nine years, including, ironically, the year in which she won her school’s “teacher of the year” award. 

CalPERS staff: Don’t sell coal stocks
Sacramento Bee | April 8, 2015
CalPERS’ investment staff said Wednesday the big pension fund should hold onto its coal investments, despite proposed legislation by the leader of the state Senate that would pressure CalPERS and CalSTRS to unload their holdings.

Teachers sue to join union without paying for political activities
LA Times | April 8, 2015
An advocacy group has filed a lawsuit seeking to stop teachers unions in California from using member dues for political purposes unless individual instructors provide their permission.

California teachers unions face new legal challenge over dues
Washington Post | April 7, 2015
Four California teachers are suing their unions over the use of member dues for political activities, opening a new legal front against unions that are already facing a separate challenge to their ability to collect dues from all teachers. 

Another lawsuit challenges teachers unions’ dues
EdSource | April 6, 2015
A second group of California teachers has filed a lawsuit that’s a cousin to Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which is challenging the right of public employees’ unions to collect mandatory dues. 

California teacher unions face new front with dues battle
Bloomberg News | April 3, 2015
California teacher unions face a new challenge from the same corporate law powerhouse that last year won a first-of-its-kind challenge to tenure rules that secure teacher's jobs. 

CA teachers protest millions of dollars in gun investments
Breitbart News | April 3, 2015
On April 2, a group of California teachers protested the fact that the California State Teachers Retirement System (CalSTRS) is still invested in guns–particularly Bushmaster Firearms–more than two years after Adam Lanza’s heinous attack on Sandy Hook Elementary. 

CalSTRS won’t rush to sell firearms investment
Sacramento Bee | April 2, 2015
CalSTRS, facing protests from schoolteachers, ruled out a quick sale Thursday of its investment in the manufacturer of the rifle used to massacre 26 students and teachers at a Connecticut elementary school in 2012. 

California teachers demand a gun-free retirement
KCRA | April 2, 2015
The teachers held a protest Thursday at the California State Teachers Retirement System headquarters in West Sacramento. 

Teachers union presses CalSTRS to unload gun investment
Sacramento Bee | April 2, 2015
A group of California schoolteachers Thursday stepped up the pressure on CalSTRS to unload its investment in the company that made the rifle used to massacre 26 people at a Connecticut elementary school. 

CalSTRS: Teachers’ retirement board re-elects chair and vice chair
PR Web | April 2, 2015
The trustees of the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) yesterday returned Harry Keiley as board chair and Sharon Hendricks as vice chair for the 2015-16 term. 

California teachers stage coordinated protests against gun investments (VIDEO)
Guns.com | April 2, 2015
A California teachers’ union staged protests in Sacramento and Los Angeles on Thursday to voice concerns over its retirement money being invested in a company that manufactures the rifle type used in the Sandy Hook school massacre. 

AM Alert: California teachers press pension fund to divest from gunmaker
Sacramento Bee | April 1, 2015
Amid a legislative push this year for California’s public pension systems to divest from coal, a new controversy is brewing over the California State Teachers’ Retirement System’s investment in a gunmaker tied to the Newtown school shooting.

Sandy Hook families support California teachers' union
CT Post | April 1, 2015
The families of seven victims of the Sandy Hook massacre have written a letter to the California Federation of Teachers supporting its effort to divest its pension fund of a company that makes guns.

Teachers demand CalSTRS unload firearms investments
Sacramento Bee | April 1, 2015
When a gunman slaughtered 26 children and adults at a Connecticut elementary school, California’s teacher pension fund responded with a forceful denunciation of gun violence and said it was rethinking its investment in the company that manufactured the firearm used in the shooting. 

State brings down the book on charters
OC Register | March 30, 2015
According to the adage, “If you can’t beat them, join them.” But not in Sacramento. When it comes to dealing with California’s successful, independent charter schools, powerful, monied special interests – and the lawmakers they fund – prefer a twist on the adage: If you can’t beat them, destroy them. This was manifested last week when four Democratic lawmakers trumpeted their introduction of a packet of new bills increasing state regulations over charters, including heightened public reporting requirements, restricting for-profit operations, greater transparency and promotion of employee rights.

L.A. Teachers Escalate
Labor Notes | March 30, 2015
Fifteen thousand teachers, counselors, and other members of United Teachers Los Angeles filled downtown’s Grand Park on February 26 to demand a fair contract for themselves and their students.

Mark James Miller: California Federation of Teachers convention another sign of unions’ revival
Noozhawk | March 27, 2015
More than 600 delegates, staff and guests. Fifty-four different union locals represented, from one end of California to the other.

Beyond Vergara
City Journal | March 27, 2015
Last year, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Rolf Treu ruled that California’s archaic seniority, tenure, and dismissal statutes were unconstitutional, adding that the evidence submitted by the plaintiffs “shocks the conscience.” The state and two teachers unions, the California Teachers Association and the California Federation of Teachers, are appealing Treu’s decision in Vergara v. California. Should the judgment survive the appeals process, legislators would need to pass new laws to fill the void. But Republican lawmakers aren’t waiting for a decision, which won’t come down for months—or possibly years.

UTLA says money is there for teachers; LA Unified not so sure
LA School Report | Feb. 19, 2015
Fueling the impasse announced yesterday between the teachers union, UTLA, and LA Unified is a dispute over so-called “unaccounted” sources of money that the teachers union says could be used for raises and other demands. 

Judgment Day
Slate | Feb. 19, 2015
On Tuesday evening, liberal Catholics in San Francisco announced a vigil to protest new sexual-conduct rules for teachers in the city’s Catholic schools. “We stand with teachers,” they declared, “in rejecting morality clauses that impede their freedom, including the right to choose who to love and marry and how to plan a family.” 

Accreditor still has final say over fate of City College of San Francisco
Chronicle of Higher Education | Feb. 19, 2015
On paper San Francisco’s city attorney won a victory on Tuesday in his lawsuit against the accreditor that oversees City College of San Francisco. 

Judge orders accreditor to redo portion of San Francisco college review
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court injunction released Wednesday would allow -- but not force -- City College of San Francisco to seek a somewhat narrow reconsideration of a private commission's decision to revoke its accreditation. 

City College will defend its accreditation following court injunction
The San Francisco Appeal | Feb. 18, 2015
The chancellor of City College of San Francisco said tonight that the college will take up the opportunity provided by a court injunction to seek reconsideration of a regional commission’s decision to revoke its accreditation. 

Middle ground remains elusive in San Francisco Catholic high school handbook fight
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 17, 2015
The clash over Catholic high school faculty handbooks and teacher contracts in the San Francisco Bay Area seems to be a standoff between those who embrace Catholic teaching as settled and unchanging and those who insist it is evolving and must do so. 

This year, billionaire Eli Broad won’t pay the $1 million prize for inner city school districts
Jewish Business News | Feb. 9, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad, 81, is refusing to pay out a $1 million prize which was promised to the best inner city school systems, arguing the schools are not improving, at least not as fast as they should, the LA Times reported. In fact, Broad is not sure it pays to support any of the traditional school systems. 

Hangovers continue from 1999-2000 pension binge
U-T San Diego | Feb. 9, 2015
Awful decisions involving public employee retirement benefits made during the Legislature’s 1999-2000 session continue to haunt California. The deluge began with the September 1999 enactment of a 50 percent retroactive increase in pensions of most state employees. The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, astonishingly, told lawmakers this giveaway would have little or no long-term cost because the stock market boom would never end. 

Broad Foundation suspends $1-million prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 8, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad has suspended a coveted, $1-million prize to honor the best urban school systems out of concern that they are failing to improve quickly enough. And, associates say, he's no longer certain that he wants to reward traditional school districts at all.

AFT president Weingarten visits town to give LA teachers a boost
LA School Report | Feb. 5, 2015
As the teachers union’s negotiations with LA Unified drag on, one of the nation’s leading voices for teachers appeared at an event last night hosted by district board member Steve Zimmer and made a strong case for union activity and solidarity.

Broad Foundation suspends public school prize, awards charter school
Breitbart News | Feb. 4, 2015
The Broad Foundation, disappointed with the lack of progress in urban school districts, has suspended its $1 million scholarship prize. The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation said “sluggish academic results from the largest urban school districts in the country” caused the foundation to put the program on hold.

S.F. archbishop’s morality clauses run counter to pope’s message
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 4, 2015
While a forward-thinking pope is changing the image of the Catholic Church by preaching compassion in Google hangouts, his archbishop in San Francisco is going in a different direction, emphasizing sexual limitations in employee morality clauses. 

Broad suspends prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 3, 2015
The locally based Broad Foundation has suspended a widely recognized prize for top-performing urban school systems. 

Landmark court decision puts students' needs first
Reason.com | Feb. 1, 2015
"Being a kid in the California system right now is a lot like the lottery," says Julia Macias, a ninth grader who lives in California's San Fernando Valley. "You might get an amazing teacher one year and then a not so amazing teacher and you see your scores are reflected upon that." 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

San Francisco archbishop defends strict teacher morality code
CBS News | Feb. 20, 2015
The archbishop of San Francisco sent a letter to California lawmakers on Thursday asking them to respect his right to hire people who uphold Catholic teachings.

Common Core lessons aim to close persistent achievement gap
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Michelle Rodriguez, assistant superintendent of the Santa Ana School District, is convinced that the new Common Core State Standards can help narrow California’s achievement gap. For all too many decades, that troubling disparity has been marked by lower test scores and higher dropout rates for African-American, Latino and low-income students, and students who are still learning English.

S.F. archbishop fires back at lawmaker critics
SF Gate | Feb. 19, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone fired back Thursday at state lawmakers who characterized as intolerant and possibly illegal his effort to have teachers at four Catholic high schools sign a labor contract declaring their opposition to same-sex unions, abortion and contraception.

California task force urges reform of special education funding
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Federal and state funding rates for special education would be equalized across California and new special education teachers would be authorized to teach general education if draft recommendations from a task force presented on Wednesday are implemented.

Under San Francisco's new handbook language, could gay marriage lead to dismissal?
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 19, 2015
If a teacher's same-sex marriage becomes public knowledge, will he or she be dismissed as an employee of a Catholic high school owned and operated by the San Francisco archdiocese?

‘Constitutional crisis’ declared as Los Angeles Unified lawyers defend teacher evaluation system
LA Daily News | Feb. 18, 2015
Los Angeles Unified lawyers argued this week that a “constitutional crisis” should allow them to keep a controversial new teacher evaluation system without the consent of its 35,000-member teachers union.

Archbishop on crash course with S.F., state
SF Gate | Feb. 18, 2015
San Francisco’s archbishop is trying to make its Catholic schools more Catholic, but city and state officials are poised to push back, saying any effort to discriminate against employees will be met with legal action.

Hundreds protest morality clause for teachers proposed by SF Archbishop
ABC 7 News | Feb. 18, 2015
There's backlash against San Francisco's Catholic archbishop and his controversial move to make teachers sign morality clauses critical of same-sex marriage and birth control, among other things.

Head Start programs in California rebound as funding increases
EdSource | Feb. 18, 2015
Two years ago, federally funded early learning providers in California were forced to reduce the available slots for 6,000 incoming students after a gridlocked Congress could not agree on how to reduce the deficit, triggering a round of automatic spending cuts to Head Start and other federal programs across the nation.

Tuition hike put on hold for UC summer school
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
Students planning to attend UC's upcoming summer school sessions got a much welcome reprieve Wednesday from tuition increases that could have been as large as 5%.

Lawmakers urge S.F. archbishop to withdraw teacher morality clauses
LA Times | Feb. 17, 2015
Eight state lawmakers on Tuesday urged San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone to withdraw the "morality clauses" he unveiled this month in a handbook for high school teachers, and to reverse his intention to redefine teachers as "ministers" in their employment contracts.

California could lose millions in funding, report states
EdSource | Feb. 15, 2015
The White House released a report that shows that school districts with large numbers of low-income students, including Los Angeles, Fresno and San Diego, stand to lose millions of dollars in federal funding under the House version of amendments to the nation’s education law.

California schools utilizing Common Core coaches
Education Dive | Feb. 13, 2015
To ease the transition to Common Core, some California districts are putting instructional coaches in classrooms to help teachers modify their lessons for the new standards.

S.F. archbishop's imposition of morality clause at schools outrages many
LA Times | Feb. 12, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone sparked a protest last summer when he ignored pleas from public officials to cancel his plans to march in Washington, D.C., against same-sex marriage.

Lawmakers skeptical of Brown’s facility funding plan
Cabinet Report | Feb. 12, 2015
Lawmakers on Wednesday expressed skepticism of Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to reduce the state's role in building and maintaining schools by pushing the bulk of the financial burden onto local districts and their communities.

Jerrod Bradley: Common Core math is worth the effort
Fresno Bee | Feb. 12, 2015
California schools are actively working toward the successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards and Smarter Balanced assessments. This is a multiyear effort and represents an important step toward better preparing students for what comes after high school.

Teachers protest as San Francisco archbishop insists schools uphold Catholic teaching on marriage
Life Site | Feb. 11, 2015
The Catholic archbishop of San Francisco is facing resistance to his efforts to protect the students in diocesan high schools from the secular wave of society, including from some teachers, parents, and students.

S.F. schools superintendent to receive 27% pay raise
SF Gate | Feb. 11, 2015
San Francisco Unified School District Superintendent Richard Carranza will see an extra $65,000 in his annual paycheck — a 27 percent raise granted unanimously by the school board Tuesday night.

Educators, builders oppose Brown's plan to stop state borrowing to pay for schools
Ventura County Star | Feb. 11, 2015
Lawmakers, educators and representatives of the homebuilding industry pushed back Wednesday against Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to end a long-standing state policy of issuing bonds to help pay for school construction.

Charter school enrollment surges
San Jose Mercury News | Feb. 11, 2015
Statewide enrollment in charter schools grew 7 percent this school year, so that more than one in 12 California public school students attends a charter school, according to an advocacy group's report released Wednesday.

Archbishop Cordileone is a true shepherd of Catholic schools
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 11, 2015
Much ado has been made about Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s efforts to ensure that Catholic schoolteachers model moral behavior. If the mission of Catholic schools is to form students both in knowledge and in faith, then he is simply doing his job to ensure that teachers have the necessary qualifications for religious education.

Autism advocacy group states vaccination link unfounded
EdSource | Feb. 10, 2015
In the midst of a nationwide measles outbreak tied to unvaccinated children and adults in California, the nation’s leading autism advocacy group has changed its position and now clearly states there is no link between vaccinations and autism.

Common Core and California’s economic success
Fox and Hounds | Feb. 9, 2015
California is on its way to becoming the world’s seventh-largest economy. Driving this growth is our world leading high technology businesses alongside our longtime strong entertainment, agriculture and energy sectors. Sustaining California’s economic growth will require a skilled workforce to meet the demands of our evolving, expanding economy. Unfortunately, there is a significant skilled workforce shortage in our state. The disconnect between workers and job readiness has challenged employers in Kern County and all of California.

Teacher directive prompts vigil at San Francisco cathedral
SF Gate | Feb. 6, 2015
About 100 people attended a vigil outside the Roman Catholic cathedral in San Francisco on Friday to protest the local archbishop's move to require teachers at four Catholic high schools to lead their public lives inside the classroom and out in accordance with church teachings on homosexuality, birth control and other hot-button issues.


New lawmakers rise instantly to run committees on children’s policies

EdSource | Feb. 5
In a sign of how much term limits are affecting the legislative process in California, freshman legislators have been appointed to chair four out of six key committees handling education and children’s issues – even though they had no prior experience as lawmakers in the state Capitol.

How not to fix No Child Left Behind
EdSource | Feb. 5
Mattilyn Gonzalez is a thriving student, who has earned straight A’s and a spot in an accelerated learning program at her middle school. Her parents, Orlando and Celine Gonzalez, trace that success back to a strong preschool program – so they were determined that their second daughter, Arianna, would get the same opportunities.

The college loan bombshell hidden in the budget
Politico | Feb. 5, 2015
In obscure data tables buried deep in its 2016 budget proposal, the Obama administration revealed this week that its student loan program had a $21.8 billion shortfall last year, apparently the largest ever recorded for any government credit program.

California lawmakers aim to limit vaccine exemptions
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
California lawmakers proposed legislation Wednesday that would require parents to vaccinate all school children unless a child's health is in danger, joining only two other states with such stringent restrictions.

Analysis: In California, charter school students most likely to be unvaccinated
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
Charter and private school students in California are much more likely to have vaccine exemptions than students enrolled in a regular district schools, according to an analysis by a researcher at the University of Maryland in College Park.

SF archdiocese requiring educators to publicly align with Catholic teaching
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 5, 2015
The Archdiocese of San Francisco is strengthening language in its faculty contract and handbook that requires high school educators to uphold Catholic teachings in their professional and public lives.

Disney measles outbreak: State lawmakers propose ditching 'personal' vaccine exemption
KPCC | Feb. 4, 2015
With California dealing with the measles outbreak that began at the Anaheim Disney theme parks, three state lawmakers Wednesday proposed ditching the law that allows parents to not vaccinate their children based on "personal belief."

What will bachelor's degrees from community colleges be worth?
LA Times | Feb. 4, 2015
When 15 California community colleges received preliminary approval to offer four-year degrees recently, officials touted the move as a way to provide highly trained workers at a lower cost, especially for technical jobs in fields such as medicine and dentistry.

Classroom coaches critical as teachers shift to Common Core
EdSource | Feb. 4, 2015
To break down the isolation that many teachers experience in their classrooms, California schools are using instructional coaches as a key tool to help teachers adapt their instruction to implement the Common Core standards in math and English language arts.

Spotlight on Jeb Bush's K-12 group as new chief takes over
Education Week | Feb. 3, 2015
Jeb Bush's decision to turn over leadership of the prominent K-12 organization he founded to Condoleezza Rice as he mulls a White House bid could signal a new phase for the Foundation for Excellence in Education—and for a broader network of advocacy groups seeking to challenge what they view as the status quo in education.

National magazine, Reason, has a look at the Vergara case
LA School Report | Feb. 3, 2015
With the eyes of the educational world closely watching the Vergara v. California case as it awaits an appeal ruling, the libertarian-tilted publication Reason magazine is the latest national media organization to profile the issue.

API should be replaced, state committee recommends
EdSource | Feb. 3, 2015
A state advisory committee that spent more than two years trying to find a way to rejigger the Academic Performance Index is now recommending moving away from that single number in favor of a more comprehensive system allowing for a broader picture of school effectiveness.

Common Core enters arena of presidential politics
EdSource | Feb. 2, 2015
With the growing certainty that Jeb Bush will be a candidate in the 2016 presidential campaign, his support for the Common Core State Standards guarantees that the standards being implemented in 43 states will be drawn into the whirlpool of presidential politics.

Easier path from community college to Cal State, report says
LA Times | Feb. 2, 2015
The number of community college students who earned degrees that streamline entry into Cal State grew significantly last year, but too many students still are unaware of the transfer program, according to a report released Monday.

CCSF special trustee retires unexpectedly
SF Gate | Feb. 1, 2015
The state-appointed “special trustee with extraordinary powers” who replaced the elected Board of Trustees at City College of San Francisco in 2013 is abruptly retiring as the huge school appears to have escaped a closure threat, for now.

CCSF special trustee to retire; replacement to be named by end of month
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 1, 2015
Robert Agrella, the special trustee tasked in 2013 with saving City College of San Francisco from losing its accreditation, will retire just weeks after the embattled school was given two more years to meet accrediting requirements.


Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: January 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS

Community college board ends agency’s exclusive right to accredit state’s community colleges
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 23, 2015
The California Community College Board of Governors decided this week to open up competition for the accreditation of community colleges in California by removing language from their regulations that gave the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges a monopoly. 

CA Community College Board of Governors ends agency’s exclusive right to accredit state’s community colleges
San Francisco Appeal | Jan. 22, 2015
The California Community College Board of Governors decided this week to open up competition for the accreditation of community colleges in California by removing language from their regulations that gave the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges a monopoly. 

Community college in the crosshairs
In These Times | Jan. 21, 2015
On December 9, 2014, dozens of students and faculty from the City College of San Francisco (CCSF) packed into a courtroom to witness the conclusion of an unusual trial.

A second chance for a community college
Public News Service | Jan. 19, 2015
One of the state's largest community colleges is getting a second chance to stay open.

Accreditor fumbled in acting against City College of San Francisco, court says
The Chronicle of Higher Education | Jan. 16, 2015
A state judge in California has concluded that a regional accreditor denied due process to City College of San Francisco, and has ruled that the two-year college must be given a new opportunity to argue against being closed. 

California lawmakers seek to restore social services funds
People’s World | Jan. 14, 2015
With California's corporate and income tax revenues rising, many Democratic state legislators are eager to restore the massive funding cuts suffered by human services programs in recent years.

Union calls City College decision ‘ticking time bomb’
SFBay.ca News | Jan. 14, 2015
Unions and officials expressed concern Wednesday that City College of San Francisco’s future remains threatened despite an announcement by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges allowing the college two more years to fight for its accreditation.

City College of San Francisco gets 2-year reprieve from accreditor
Wall Street Journal | Jan. 14, 2015
City College of San Francisco, one of the nation’s largest community colleges that had been threatened with loss of accreditation, will get another two years to right itself.

Unions voice concern over City College’s future after restoration status granted by accrediting commission
San Francisco Appeal | Jan. 14, 2015
Unions and officials expressed concern today that City College of San Francisco’s future remains threatened despite an announcement by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges allowing the college two more years to fight for its accreditation.

California schools fail students, teachers with nurse shortage
San Jose Inside | Jan. 12, 2015
Serious health issues can play out in schools every day, sometimes in life and death ways. Yet few schools have a credentialed school nurse at the ready to appropriately address the problem.

Survey: Teachers support changes in state job protection laws
LA School Report | Jan. 12, 2015
The majority of public school teachers who participated in a new survey support changes in state teacher job protection laws that were the focus of last year’s landmark ruling in Vergara v. California.

Brown unveils largest-ever California budget proposal
Wall Street Journal | Jan. 9, 2015
Even as he proposed a record $113.3 billion state budget plan Friday, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown faced potential political fights with members of his own party over tax increases, state worker benefits, education spending and programs for the poor.

School windfall: Brown proposes $7.8 billion more for education
San Jose Mercury News | Jan. 9, 2015
California public schools and community colleges will reap the lion's share of revenues from a booming economy, with their budgets growing by $7.8 billion, Gov. Jerry Brown outlined on Friday.

Brown’s budget: More for Common Core, Internet, charters, special ed
LA School Report | Jan. 9, 2015
Gov. Jerry Brown‘s proposed state budget for 2015-2016, released today, includes $52 million more in K-12 funding than last year’s budget.

Gov. Brown's California budget calls for record $113 billion in spending
San Jose Mercury News | Jan. 9, 2015
The $113 billion state budget plan that Gov. Jerry Brown rolled out Friday sets up two potentially fierce political confrontations.

Brown Unveils Largest-Ever California Budget Proposal
Down Jones Business News | Jan. 9, 2015
Even as he proposed a record $113.3 billion state budget plan Friday, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown faced potential political fights with members of his own party over tax increases, state worker benefits, education spending and programs for the poor. 

California Gov. Jerry Brown set to present budget
Wall Street Journal | Jan. 9, 2015
California Gov. Jerry Brown will face his first political test of the year when he releases his initial 2015-16 budget proposal Friday--a test that will likely come from members of his own Democratic Party. 

Big CCSF decisions loom: college’s future at stake
SF Gate | Jan. 9, 2015
January is a crucial month for City College of San Francisco. The commission trying to revoke its accreditation voted privately this week on whether to grant the college two more years to comply with standards, and could announce its decision at the end of its three-day meeting Friday in Sacramento — or delay the announcement for days or weeks.

For City College of San Francisco, new year a matter of survival
Diverse | Jan. 1, 2015
In the last two years, City College of San Francisco, one of the nation’s largest community colleges, has seen its student enrollment shrink by more than 20 percent, from more than 100,000 students to fewer than 80,000, according to college officials. 

Several education-related bills to take effect this year
Contra Costa Times | Jan. 1, 2015
As educators and administrators return to schools this month, many will help implement new laws taking effect that will require increased teacher training and fewer suspensions and expulsions, among other changes. 

New complaints filed against CCSF accreditor
San Francisco Examiner | Dec. 23, 2014
A coalition working to preserve City College of San Francisco's accreditation announced two new complaints Monday against the commission with authority to revoke that accreditation, coalition members said.

 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS 

House education panel head endorses annual student testing
Education Week | Jan. 23, 2015
The chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee on Thursday endorsed continuing the federally required annual testing of students under the No Child Left Behind education law.

Legislative leaders want to debate school bond
Cabinet Report | Jan. 22, 2015
Despite the state’s long-standing partnership with schools to help pay new construction and remodeling costs, Gov. Jerry Brown has made it clear he doesn’t like the idea of issuing another statewide facilities bond anytime soon.

LAO backs repealing cap on districts’ reserves
EdSource | Jan. 22, 2015
The California School Boards Association’s campaign to persuade the Legislature to reverse a cap on school district reserves got a boost this week when the Legislative Analyst’s Office issued a report issued endorsing a repeal.

Brown, districts at odds over school construction bonds
EdSource | Jan. 21, 2015
Determined to shed long-term state debt, Gov. Jerry Brown wants the state to cease issuing K-12 school construction bonds, leaving school districts to pay the tab for building and renovating schools. A coalition of school districts and the building industry has responded with plans to go straight to voters with a $9 billion state school building bond in 2016.

Calif. watchdog agency recommends repeal of new school budget caps
Reuters | Jan. 21, 2015
California's watchdog agency recommended on Wednesday that the legislature repeal a new law that caps the size of school district budgets, warning that over 91 percent of the state's districts would have violated the new rules if they had been in place in 2014.

California community colleges set record for degrees, certificates
LA Times | Jan. 21, 2015
The number of students who received a degree or certificate from a California community college hit a record high last year and more of them completed remedial math and English courses, officials announced this week.

California’s community colleges need more state attention
SF Gate | Jan. 21, 2015
Education officials have selected 15 California community colleges to offer bachelor’s degrees, in a closely watched pilot program that could have big impacts on higher education throughout the state.

You're Invited! The Impact of Vergara v. California on the Future of Education
Reason.com | Jan. 21, 2015
Last year, a landmark education case took aim at laws protecting bad teachers—and the students won. Vergara v. California reaffirmed the fundamental right of every student to learn from effective teachers and have an equal opportunity to succeed in school, paving the way for teacher accountability and greater choice. 

U.S. education committee calls for strengthening Head Start
EdSource | Jan. 21, 2015
The U.S. House of Representatives education committee released a white paper Wednesday that calls for strengthening the federal Head Start preschool program by coordinating existing early learning programs, improving quality and enhancing parental involvement.

California community colleges board approves 15 pilot bachelor’s degrees
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 20, 2015
Bachelor’s degrees in mortuary work, ranch management and consumer technology design will soon be coming to California community colleges.

Funding 2 years of college is a small price to pay to get educated workers
LA Times | Jan. 19, 2015
President Obama's bold proposal to make two years of community college virtually free is the most encouraging idea for higher education to emerge from Washington in years. Just like the 1862 Morrill Act, which donated land on which to establish great public universities, and the GI Bill, which helped World War II veterans attend college, the president's plan is a game changer, potentially adding two years of college onto every young person's education.

Judge rules in favor of City College of San Francisco
Diverse Education | Jan. 18, 2015
An accrediting commission must give City College of San Francisco — one of California’s largest community colleges — a chance to respond to criticism before deciding whether to stick to its decision to revoke the school’s accreditation, a judge said Friday.

Op-Ed: City College San Francisco gets another chance at accreditation
Digital Journal | Jan. 18, 2015
Judge Curtis E.A. Karnow of the Superior Court of California for San Francisco proposed an injunction on January 16, which requires the accrediting board to reconsider its termination of City College's accreditation status forcing it to close.

The real test of Common Core is about to begin
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 17, 2015
This spring, for the first time since its embrace of a new national road map for public school instruction, California’s students will take their first real Common Core tests.

All eyes on City College’s future
SFBAY.ca News | Jan. 16, 2015
All eyes are on City College of San Francisco as the future of the community college remains up in the air.

Judge says accrediting panel denied San Francisco college a fair review
LA Times | Jan. 16, 2015
In revoking the accreditation of City College of San Francisco, a private commission violated the law in ways that denied the 80,000-student school a fair hearing, a judge tentatively ruled Friday.

Judge gives City College a second chance
SF Weekly | Jan. 16, 2015
City College can finally breath again after a San Francisco Superior Court judge's tentative decision Friday gave the beleaguered college a second chance to keep its doors open to students.

Judge rules on suit over California college's accreditation
ABC 7 | Jan. 16, 2015
A judge says an accrediting commission must give City College of San Francisco a chance to respond to criticism before deciding whether to stick to its decision to revoke the school's accreditation.

SF City College given a chance to respond to criticisms
SF Gate | Jan. 16, 2015
City College of San Francisco will have another chance to challenge the critical findings of an accrediting commission that could close the doors to the school’s nearly 80,000 students, a judge ruled Friday.

Judge: City College did not receive ‘fair’ accreditation hearing
KQED | Jan. 16, 2015
A Superior Court judge has handed City College of San Francisco a temporary legal win in its fight to maintain accreditation.

Judge issues favorable ruling in CCSF’s quest to retain accreditation
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 16, 2015
City College can celebrate another win this week after a tentative decision was handed down Friday by Superior Court Judge Curtis Karnow in the trial that many see as the key to keeping the school's accreditation.

Judge tentatively rolls back City College deaccreditation
SF Bay.ca News | Jan. 16, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court judge announced a tentative ruling Friday that would roll back a regional accrediting commission’s 2013 decision to remove the accreditation of City College of San Francisco. 

Accreditor fumbled in acting against City College of San Francisco, state court says
The Chronicle of Higher Education | Jan. 16, 2015
A state judge in California has concluded that a regional accreditor denied due process to City College of San Francisco, and says the two-year college must be given a new opportunity to argue against being closed. 

SF City College hangs by a thread
Courthouse News Service | Jan. 16, 2015
The City College of San Francisco will keep its accreditation until a commission explains in writing all of its reasons for decertifying the school, a Superior Court judge ruled Friday. 

Tentative ruling could provide relief for embattled City College of San Francisco
KRON | Jan. 16, 2015
City College of San Francisco must get the chance to respond to criticism before it can lose its accreditation, a judge has ruled. 

Judge rules on suit over California college's accreditation
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 16, 2015
An accrediting commission must give City College of San Francisco — one of California's largest community colleges — a chance to respond to criticism before deciding whether to stick to its decision to revoke the school's accreditation, a judge said Friday. 

Judge tentatively reverses decision to revoke CCSF accreditation
NBC Bay Area | Jan. 16, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court judge announced a tentative ruling Friday that would roll back a regional accrediting commission's 2013 decision to remove the accreditation of City College of San Francisco. 

California community college deserves hearing on accreditation: judge
Reuters | Jan. 16, 2015
A college regulator violated the law by failing to give California's largest community college a fair hearing before deciding to terminate its accreditation, according to a tentative court ruling on Friday. 

New York's tenure laws go to court
Huffington Post | Jan. 16, 2015
Earlier this week, oral arguments opened in Wright v. New York, a lawsuit challenging New York statutes that make it nearly impossible to replace teachers who are not up to the job. This first motion will determine whether or not the case should proceed at all. It should. Like Vergara v. California before it, Wright v. New York forces a much needed examination about whether the state is delivering on its legal obligations. 

Battle lines drawn on annual testing in ESEA renewal
Education Week | Jan. 16, 2015
Thirteen years after mandating high-stakes testing, Congress is kicking off its most serious attempt yet to update the Elementary and Secondary Education Act with partisan wrangling over whether to ditch the law’s signature schedule of annual assessments. 

Conflict ahead over California school bonds
The Bond Buyer | Jan. 15, 2015
The budget proposal California Gov. Jerry Brown submitted last week is fueling a conflict over state bond funding for K-12 education. 

Governor’s proposed budget called “a gift” to adult education
EdSource | Jan. 15, 2015
The governor’s proposed budget, unveiled last week, allocates $500 million for an Adult Education Block Grant, with a provision that existing K-12 adult ed programs be funded for another year. 

This is what teachers think their tenure process should look like, poll shows
Huffington Post | Jan. 14, 2015
In the same week that a group of parents in New York are pushing a judge to hear a case that could limit teacher tenure, an education nonprofit has released a poll detailing what educators think their job protections should look like. 

CCSF wins reprieve: Shutdown averted with 2-year extension
San Francisco Chronicle | Jan. 14, 2015
The commission threatening to revoke City College of San Francisco’s accreditation has granted the school two additional years to bring its finances and governing structure into compliance with the group’s standards, its chairman said Wednesday. 

How to report test scores to parents debated
EdSource | Jan. 14, 2015
With California students set to begin taking new Smarter Balanced tests in the Common Core State Standards this spring, state education officials are worried about how parents will view the results – especially if, as experts predict, their kids’ initial scores will be low. 

Suspensions, expulsions down statewide
EdSource | Jan. 14, 2015
New state data show a steep drop in suspensions and expulsions of California students, continuing a recent downward trend. Altogether, 20 percent fewer students were expelled and 15 percent fewer students were suspended in 2013-14 than in the previous year. 

Accrediting panel gives City College of San Francisco a 2-year reprieve
LA Times | Jan. 14, 2015
San Francisco's only community college will remain accredited for at least two more years in a reprieve announced Wednesday to keep the institution's doors open for nearly 80,000 students. 

City College of San Francisco wins accreditation reprieve
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 14, 2015
Eighteen months after having its accreditation terminated, the City College of San Francisco has been granted restoration status by the regional accreditor and will have two more years to come into compliance with eligibility requirements. 

Restoration status approved for CCSF in quest to remain accredited
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 14, 2015
City College of San Francisco has been given two more years to reach full compliance with accrediting requirements, an accrediting body announced Wednesday. 

City College of San Francisco gets two more years to resolve accreditation issues
KQED | Jan. 14, 2015
The agency in charge of certifying the state’s junior and community colleges has given City College of San Francisco two more years to comply with eligibility standards. For now, that decision — made last week and announced Wednesday — effectively ends a shutdown threat that has hung over the school for more than two years. 

The nuts and bolts of Obama's community college plan
LA Times | Jan. 14, 2015
The rumors started early last week. President Obama had been outlining his goals for the last two years of his presidency and had long been interested in improving students' access to college. The president was scheduled to go to Knoxville, Tenn., on Friday. Observers connected the dots and speculated that he would announce a national version of the Volunteer State's program to guarantee high school graduates free tuition to community college.

Gov. Brown releases $164.7-billion budget plan, calls for restraint
LA Times | Friday, Jan. 9, 2015
Four days after taking the oath of office for the fourth time, Gov. Jerry Brown released his $164.7-billion budget proposal on Friday morning in the Capitol.

NCLB rewrite could target mandate on annual tests
Education Week | Jan. 9, 2015
For more than a decade, even amid big revisions to the original No Child Left Behind Act, one thing has remained constant: States have required students to take annual tests in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school.

Obama plan would make community colleges nearly free for millions
LA Times | Jan. 8, 2015
Aiming to dramatically expand access to higher education, President Obama on Thursday proposed making community college virtually free for millions of high school graduates — a potential boon for California's system, the largest in the nation.

Obama proposes free community college
EdSource | Jan. 8, 2015
President Barack Obama has unveiled a proposal to make the first two years of community college free for students who are diligent about working toward a degree.

Digital Library’s use, usefulness questioned
EdSource | Jan. 8, 2015
Midway through the school year, about half the state’s teachers have access to a new “Digital Library” the state purchased to help them teach the Common Core State Standards, but it’s unclear how many teachers are actually using it and how useful it is.

Accrediting commission to decide on restoration status for CCSF
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 7, 2015
The accrediting commission for City College of San Francisco will decide this week whether to grant the embattled school restoration status, a newly formed policy that would give the college two more years to meet accrediting requirements.

Report: State no longer at bottom in spending
EdSource | Jan. 7, 2015
Education Week’s annual state rankings on K-12 education had welcome, though outdated, news for California: No longer rock-bottom, California moved from 50th to 46th in per-student state spending in 2011-12, the latest data cited.

Will the court give Abood the boot?
City Journal | Jan. 7, 2015
Last year marked a legal turning point for California’s teachers’ unions and public employee unions across the nation. First, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Rolf M. Treu ruled in June that some of the teachers’ work rules—including tenure, seniority, and dismissal laws—violated the state and federal constitutions. 

CCSF not among California community colleges seeking four-year degree programs
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 6, 2015
Nearly three dozen California community colleges have applied for a pilot program that would allow them to offer four-year degrees for the first time, but City College of San Francisco is not among them.

Brown: $65.7 billion for schools next year
EdSource | Jan. 5, 2015
In an inaugural address rooted in nostalgia but boasting ambitious goals for the future, Gov. Jerry Brown again identified education as a key focus – giving it top billing during remarks at his historic fourth swearing-in ceremony Monday and forecasting billions in additional school funding next year.

EdWatch 2015: 10 issues to watch
EdSource | Jan. 4, 2015
2015 promises to be a pivotal year for several major reforms in public education, including the continuing rollout of the Common Core State Standards, the implementation of the state’s new school financing and accountability system, and the administration of the online Smarter Balanced assessments to millions of students this spring. There will be other issues to watch. Here’s our list of the top 10. Let us know what you would have added.

California colleges see surge in efforts to unionize adjunct faculty
LA Times | Jan. 3, 2015
A wave of union organizing at college campuses across California and the nation in recent months is being fueled by part-time faculty who are increasingly discontented over working conditions and a lack of job security.

Student needs should trump interests of adults
U-T San Diego | Jan. 2, 2015
Few 2014 court decisions captured the nation’s attention like Vergara v. California. Educators, union leaders and community advocacy groups as well as legislators and parents nationwide waited anxiously to hear how Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Rolf M. Treu would rule on permanency, teacher dismissal and “first in, last out.”

A fresh approach to ranking states on education
Education Week | Jan. 2, 2015
The 19th annual edition of Education Week's Quality Counts takes a fresh approach to the state report card.

Teacher tenure, taxes on union executive’s 2015 agenda
Sacramento Bee | Dec. 25, 2014
The walls of Joe Nuñez’s second-floor office, a stone’s throw from the state Capitol, bear reprints of fruit- and vegetable-crate labels from California farms, colorful reminders of his humble roots as the son of south-state farmworkers.

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: December 2014

CFT IN THE NEWS

CCSF accreditor takes beating in panel hosted by Rep. Jackie Speier
San Francisco Examiner | Dec. 16, 2014
Panelists at City College of San Francisco unloaded on the state's accrediting commission Monday, accusing it of unfair actions against the embattled institution.

Teachers need to be honest about their unions
U-T San Diego | Dec. 15, 2014
This editorial page often is critical of the California Teachers Association and the California Federation of Teachers. This prompts bafflement, anger and disappointment among many individual teachers. “Your narrative about public school teachers is totally off base,” a veteran history teacher wrote in a recent email.

Kent Wong to Keynote SFV JACL Installation
The Rafu Shimpo | Dec. 14, 2014
The San Fernando Valley JACL chapter has announced that Kent Wong, director of the UCLA Labor Center, will be the keynote speaker at its installation luncheon at the Odyssey Restaurant in Granada Hills on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015.

Mission improbable: City College may soon close. And if it doesn't, it may never be the same.
SF Weekly | Dec. 9, 2014
Football players clad in black hurl themselves into football players wearing white. "You call that hittin' somebody?" the black-clad quarterback shouts as he picks himself up after a tackle. It's the last Saturday in November, and the City College of San Francisco's Rams, in black, and American River College, in white, square off for the Northern California football championship. 

Proposition 30 tax hikes should expire as scheduled: Jon Coupal
LA Daily News | Dec. 9, 2014
No matter how high taxes are increased, it’s never enough for public officials and bureaucrats who live off taxpayer-funded paychecks. According to these people, there is always one more dollar that is needed to make government “whole.” And being made “whole” in California means maintaining the highest paid government employees in all 50 states.

Will state reject Obama's teacher-training reform?
U-T San Diego | Dec. 4, 2014
President Barack Obama deserves credit for being the nation’s leading education reformer. For nearly six years, the president and Education Secretary Arne Duncan have used both the bully pulpit and federal grants to encourage states and large school districts to focus on improving teacher quality. 

Districts need to recommit to classified workers to make schools work better: Guest commentary
LA Daily News | Dec. 3, 2014
The women and men who clean classrooms, drive school buses, maintain security on campuses, assist students, greet parents, prepare and serve food in cafeterias, maintain and repair schools and assist teachers in the classroom are the glue that keep our schools and public education working.

Proposition 30 tax hike is working and must be kept in place
Sacramento Bee | Nov. 30, 2014
Proposition 30 is the best thing to happen to public education and the economy in California in a generation. Two years after voters adopted the tax measure, funding for public education has rebounded and the state economy and budget have improved. 

California students take a stand to topple teacher tenure; New York up next
PBS | Nov. 29, 2014
MEGAN THOMPSON: Sisters Beatriz and Elizabeth Vergara attend public high school in a low-income, mostly Hispanic section of northern Los Angeles. The girls are aiming for college, and would be the first in the family with higher degrees. 

Legislature needs to increase funding for UC and CSU
SF Gate | Nov. 24, 2014
The students protesting the decision by the University of California Regents to raise tuition 28 percent over the next five years have every right to be angry. Years of escalating tuition and fee increases for higher education have put a college education out of reach for too many families in this country. Students able to borrow the money will be saddled with debt for as long as 30 or 40 years. No wonder they are angry. 

 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

Teaching English learners language of math
EdSource | Dec. 18, 2014
As teacher David Ramirez strode around his 7th-grade classroom at Oakland’s Urban Promise Academy, he was taking on a central challenge of the new Common Core standards: how to ensure that students who lack proficiency in English are able to benefit from a more language-based approach to learning complex math concepts.

Ferguson school board elections unfair to black candidates, lawsuit alleges
Education Week | Dec. 18, 2014
A federal lawsuit filed today by the American Civil Liberties Union alleges that school board elections in Ferguson, Mo., use a system that keeps blacks "all but locked out of the political process."

For first time in 18 months, CCSF board of trustees to hold official meeting
San Francisco Examiner | Dec. 17, 2014
The City College of San Francisco board of trustees will meet today for the first time since losing power a year and a half ago after the state's accrediting body threatened to strip CCSF of its accreditation.

State to fight lawsuit by low-income students
EdSource | Dec. 17, 2014
State finance officials last week granted the California Department of Education $3.4 million to fight a lawsuit that demands the state fix disruptive conditions in some high-poverty schools where students allegedly are being denied the fundamental right to an education.

California schools step up efforts to help 'long-term English learners'
LA Times | Dec. 17, 2014
After more than 11 years in Los Angeles public schools, Dasha Cifuentes still isn't speaking or writing English at grade level. The U.S. native, whose parents are Mexican immigrants, was raised in a Spanish-speaking household and she acknowledges that the two languages get confused in her mind.

Critics say college graduation rates don't tell the whole story
LA Times | Dec. 17, 2014
Pushing public colleges and universities to increase graduation rates has become a key objective for President Obama and California Gov. Jerry Brown, among others, as they seek to hold higher education institutions more accountable.

The Jury Remains Out on Teacher Tenure and the Courts: A TC conference weighs the implications of Vergara and two New York cases
TC Columbia | Dec. 16, 2014
In June, a trial court ruled that California’s procedures on teacher tenure and dismissal violated the state constitution because they disproportionately exposed low-income and minority students to “grossly ineffective” teachers.

Women's colleges lead push to redefine gender rules
LA Times | Dec. 15, 2014
At a women's college, gender should be the easiest qualification for entry. That's no longer the case. Women's colleges across the country are reconsidering their admission policies to adapt to a changing world in which gender norms are being challenged and more transgender students are seeking to enroll. 

Young Kim introduces bill to freeze CSU tuition while Prop. 30 is in effect
Daily Titan | Dec. 14, 2014
Assemblywoman Young Kim (R-Fullerton) introduced AB 42, an Assembly Bill that would institute a tuition freeze for the California State University, preventing CSUs from increasing student tuition for as long as the state receives Proposition 30 funds.

Latinos underrepresented among CSU applicants
Sacramento Bee | Dec. 12, 2014
California State University released preliminary data on Thursday showing a sixth straight year of record application numbers: 290,473 high school seniors and transfer students sent 790,900 applications to the system’s 23 campuses, almost 4 percent more than last fall.

Districts want to highlight retirees’ costs
EdSource | Dec. 11, 2014
A coalition of school districts wants Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature to clarify how much money will be available to schools following the deal that legislators struck earlier this year requiring districts to make higher pension payments.

Brown, Legislature study ways to avoid UC, Cal State tuition hikes
LA Times | Dec. 11, 2014
The fate of the proposed tuition increase at University of California campuses now rests in the hands of the governor and state lawmakers, who are aligned in opposition to it but divided over how to scrap it.

UC, CSU applications surge to record highs
Sacramento Bee | Dec. 11, 2014
Concerns over rising tuition costs and new student fees haven’t dimmed interest in California’s public university systems. Both the University of California and California State University saw a record number of applications from high school seniors and transfer students this year, according to figures released Thursday.

Funding to expand schools’ high-speed Internet
EdSource | Dec. 11, 2014
The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to increase funding that supporters say will expand the Internet capacity for an additional 40 million students in 100,000 schools nationwide.

Re-evaluation of CCSF pitched during trial’s closing arguments
San Francisco Examiner | Dec. 10, 2014
City College of San Francisco may know as early as next month whether it will qualify for restoration status or be re-evaluated by the commission that voted to revoke the school's accreditation last year.

Fate of SF Community College put to trial
Courthouse News Service | Dec. 10, 2014
The bid to save the City College of San Francisco's accreditation is now in a judge's hands after closing arguments Tuesday.

Spending bill would fund preschool grants, but not race to top
Education Week | Dec. 10, 2014
Congress unveiled its long-awaited spending bill Tuesday evening, which would fund most of the government, including the U.S. Department of Education and federally funded education programs, through September 2015.

UC student workers' union urges divestment from Israel
LA Times | Dec. 10, 2014
Members of the union that represents UC students who work as teaching assistants, tutors and readers have voted to urge the UC regents to divest itself of stock in Israeli institutions and international companies that backers say violate human rights and aid the occupation of Palestinian territories.

Fate of City College of S.F. now in judge’s hands
SF Gate | Dec. 9, 2014
The fate of City College of San Francisco is now in the hands of a judge after lawyers made their final arguments Tuesday about whether the beloved institution deserves to have its accreditation revoked.

Judge hears closing arguments in City College case, will rule in January
San Francisco Appeal | Dec. 9, 2014
A San Francisco Superior Court judge said today he will rule in January on whether to overturn a regional agency’s termination of accreditation for City College of San Francisco.

CCSF faculty irked by planned departmental changeups
San Francisco Examiner | Dec. 9, 2014
City College of San Francisco administrators and faculty are clashing over a potential series of changes to various departments, fueled by a purported lack of communication between faculty and the college district.

L.A. Unified to require ethnic studies for high school graduation
LA Times | Dec. 8, 2014
Students in the Los Angeles Unified School District will be required for the first time to take ethnic studies classes as part of an effort to encourage stronger cultural understanding.

Common Core qualms spike homeschool numbers
One News Now | Dec. 6, 2014
The proliferating numbers of homeschoolers in America — estimates place the population at more than 2 million — have been boosted even higher of late due to increasing agitation from parents over the federally imposed Common Core in public schools from coast-to-coast.

California's K-12 funding overhaul slowly takes root
Education Week | Dec. 4, 2014
Aiming to fund its schools more efficiently and effectively, California has chosen an unusual, lead-from-behind approach that provides more state money to districts, but pushes communities to hold their local schools accountable for how that aid is used and for student performance.

Mapping can point out education inequities
EdSource | Dec. 4, 2014
Communities interested in supporting students’ learning need a clear picture of where the gaps in resources are, according to a report by the New America Foundation that highlights the use of maps to identify inequities.

Cooperation works best
Petaluma Argus-Courier | Dec. 3, 2014
In regard to the Nov. 20 Argus-Courier editorial, “Teachers need to be reasonable,” we would like to provide your readers with relevant facts so that they might better understand the situation. The unfounded opinion that “the labor dispute could be resolved in short order if the teachers union would drop its unreasonable insistence that hundreds of its members be allowed to observe negotiations” intimately mirrors the same condescending attitude that the superintendent and school board president exhibit toward the teachers and support staff of Petaluma City Schools.

City College San Francisco students sue police for excessive force
NBC Bay Area | Dec. 3, 2014
The City of San Francisco and City College of San Francisco were hit by civil rights lawsuits filed in federal court on Tuesday.

Police broke protesting students' bones and caused a concussion, lawsuit claims
Huffington Post | Dec. 3, 2014
Two City College of San Francisco students who report suffering from broken bones and a concussion, as well as being choked and pepper-sprayed, at the hands of campus and city police filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Tuesday.

White House's college ratings system controversial even before completion
LA Times | Dec. 3, 2014
The Obama administration is developing a national rating system for colleges and universities to provide more transparency and give students and taxpayers a better sense of where to spend their education funds.

Sen. Lara proposes giving lawmakers some control of UC system
LA Times | Dec. 3, 2014
Alarmed by a proposal to raise tuition at University of California campuses by up to 5% annually for five years, Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) on Wednesday proposed a constitutional amendment be placed on the 2016 ballot to strip the UC system of its historic autonomy and give lawmakers new controls as they see fit.

California’s temporary tax increase should be extended, most say
SF Gate | Dec. 2, 2014
A majority of Californians are willing to renew the Proposition 30 taxes they voted for two years ago, even though Gov. Jerry Brown said the boost in the state sales tax and the income tax of the richest residents would be temporary, a new Public Policy Institute of California poll shows.

FBI seizes LAUSD records related to troubled iPad program
LA Times | Dec. 2, 2014
Fallout over the Los Angeles school district's $1.3-billion plan to provide iPads to every student intensified Tuesday with the revelation that the FBI is conducting a criminal investigation into the failed effort.

California offers budgetary lessons for U.S. government, Stanford professor says
Stanford News | Dec. 2, 2014
Once the fodder of late-night comedians, California's budgetary strategy is actually one that national lawmakers might emulate, a Stanford tax scholar says.

Can collaboration between schools, unions fix failing campuses?
LA Times | Dec. 1, 2014
In 2011, Fedde Middle School faced a dilemma. The federal government was offering the struggling campus, located in the low-income and heavily immigrant city of Hawaiian Gardens, $1.5 million to help it improve. The catch was that the school had to use student test scores to evaluate teachers.

As new Legislature begins, Speaker Atkins takes aim at UC tuition
LA Times | Dec. 1, 2014
Amid the feel-good proceedings of the Legislature's swearing-in ceremony, Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins sent a clear signal Monday of a brewing policy showdown: the proposed University of California tuition hikes.

Stanford teams with teacher union CTA to train for Common Core
LA Times | Nov. 30, 2014
Stanford University is joining with the state's largest teachers union to prepare schools for new learning goals that will change the way California students are taught and tested.

Cal State funding talks include scenario of turning away freshmen
LA Times | Nov. 30, 2014
The University of California's decision to raise tuition generated much controversy. But the California State system could consider what by some measures is an even more radical plan as it struggles with budget constraints and increasing demand from freshmen and community college transfers. Rather than increasing tuition, Cal State has reduced enrollment targets for this fall. And trustees recently discussed the dark scenario of having to stop accepting freshmen.

Big state tax decisions lie ahead for California voters
LA Times | Nov. 27, 2014
Picking a new president might not be the only crucial issue before California voters at the polls in two years' time.

S.F. district, union agree to pay raise for teachers, assistants
SF Gate | Nov. 25, 2014
After 11 months of negotiations, the San Francisco Unified School District and the United Educators of San Francisco have agreed on a tentative contract that would give teachers and teaching assistants a 12 percent raise over three years.

Could Minnesota be next for a Vergara-style lawsuit?
Education Week | Nov. 21, 2014
The Minneapolis Star Tribune has an interesting interview with Marcellus McRae, one of the lawyers representing plaintiffs in the Vergara v. California lawsuit. In it, he suggests that the state could be ripe for a similar challenge.

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: November 2014

CFT IN THE NEWS

Opponents of UC tuition hike take over building in protest
San Francisco Appeal | Nov. 19, 2014
A group of students and activists has taken over Wheeler Hall at the University of California at Berkeley this evening following a vote by a University of California Board of Regent committee earlier today supporting a tuition increase. 

In Cupertino: CCSF students, faculty demand restoration of local control
Cupertino Patch | Nov. 18, 2014 Dozens of students, faculty and other community members attended Monday’s California Community Colleges Board of Governors meeting in Cupertino to urge the swift return to power of the San Francisco Community College District’s elected board of trustees.

ALEC in cahoots with accrediting commission?
The Guardsman | Nov. 13, 2014
In light of City College’s accreditation crisis, college advocates have questioned whether the regional agency responsible for terminating the school’s accreditation has connections to a controversial think tank known as the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).

California chief's win a bright spot for teachers' unions
Education Week | Nov. 11, 2014
California Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson's narrow re-election victory over challenger Marshall Tuck in the highest-profile election for state K-12 chief this year gave teachers' unions a big political win over their critics, after tens of millions of dollars in campaign contributions supercharged that race. 

Triumph of the status quo
City Journal | Nov. 7, 2014
California’s education reformers had high hopes for Marshall Tuck’s insurgent campaign against State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson. The 41-year-old former investment banker and charter school president tried to paint the 65-year-old incumbent, former legislator, and fellow Democrat as a creature of the state’s powerful teachers’ unions. 

Campos concedes to Chiu in District 17 assembly race
The San Francisco Appeal | Nov. 6, 2014
San Francisco Supervisor David Campos has conceded the race for the District 17 state assembly seat, his rival Supervisor David Chiu said this evening.

Incumbent Honda appears to survive challenge from Khanna
The Rafu Shimpo | Nov. 6, 2014
Following a contentious campaign, Rep. Mike Honda (D-San Jose) has apparently survived a challenge by fellow Democrat Ro Khanna in Tuesday’s election. 

Teachers unions defend their ground by getting Torlakson reelected
LA Times | Nov. 5, 2014
Teachers unions defended their ground in California this week — and bucked national trends — by helping to reelect a state schools chief in a race with broad implications for education policy and politics. 

California schools chief re-elected in race that became referendum on education reform
Reuters | Nov. 5, 2014
California's union-backed schools superintendent has won re-election, defeating a challenger who called for tying teacher pay to student performance and a reshaping of tenure rules in an expensive race that emerged as a referendum on education reform. 

Tom Torlakson declares victory in Calif. chief's election
Education Week | Nov. 5, 2014
Tom Torlakson has won the California state superintendent's race, beating Marshall Tuck after a close campaign. Torlakson, the incumbent, declared victory early on Nov. 5. With 100 percent of precincts reporting, according to the Los Angeles Times, Torlakson won 52 percent of the vote, compared to 48 percent for Tuck. UPDATE (12:53 P.M., Nov. 5): The Associated Press has called the race in favor of Torlakson, and Tuck has conceded the race. 

Torlakson victory ensures continuity in reforms
EdSource | Nov. 5, 2014
One immediate consequence of State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson’s rebuff of challenger Marshall Tuck is to ensure the continuance of the cohesion in state education policy that has been forged since Gov. Jerry Brown returned to Sacramento four years ago. 

SF election 2014 wrap up: Chiu leading assembly race; incumbents re-elected; soda tax falls flat
The San Francisco Appeal | Nov. 5, 2014
David Chiu appears to be coming out in front of David Campos in the San Francisco race for District 17 state assemblymember, but the race is still too close to call, according to unofficial election results that came in late Tuesday night.

Inclusive selection process needed in selecting next LAUSD superintendent Guest commentary
LA Daily News | Nov. 3, 2014
With the departure of Superintendent John Deasy, the LAUSD school board has an opportunity to restore the community’s confidence in a school district that seems plagued with conflict and mismanagement. 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

Colleges apply to offer four-year degrees
U-T San Diego | Nov. 21, 2014
Grossmont-Cuyamaca, MiraCosta, San Diego and Southwestern community college districts are among 36 in the state that have officially expressed interest in offering four-year bachelor’s degrees.

Los Angeles schools superintendent backs “parent trigger” privatization scheme

World Socialist Web Site | Nov. 21, 2014
The interim superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), Ramon Cortines, announced last week that the “parent trigger” law can be applied this year, reversing a temporary block on the procedure put in place by his predecessor, John Deasy.

After UC regents OK tuition plan, eyes turn to Gov. Jerry Brown, state funding
LA Times | Nov. 20, 2014
The votes were cast and the protesters' chanting died down. Now months of political wrangling and budget negotiations are ahead before UC students know for sure how much next year's tuition will be.

Is the University of California system turning private?

  1. Newsweek | Nov. 20, 2014
    On the same day that the University of California (UC) approved significant system-wide tuition hikes and its students storm police barricades and shatter glass doorways in protest, UC Berkeley, the crown jewel of one of the nation’s most prestigious public university systems remains committed to its “Big Give”—in the school’s own words, the “first-ever 24-hour online fund-raising drive to support students, faculty and research.”

University of California approves tuition increase proposal

Sacramento Bee | Nov. 20, 2014
The University of California Board of Regents voted Thursday to adopt a plan that would allow UC to raise tuition by up to 5 percent annually over the next five years if the university does not receive more funding from the state.

Immigration order could mean more money for schools

U-T San Diego | Nov. 20, 2014
For public schools in this border region, educators hope immigration changes will curb the fear of deportation that many families face — something they say could assist districts financially, while also helping students emotionally.

Charter schools break law by making parents volunteer, report says

LA Times | Nov. 20, 2014
Scores of California charter schools require parents to volunteer as a condition for their child’s enrollment in violation of state law, according to a report by a civil rights organization.

California revenue projected to exceed budget estimates by $2 billion

Sacramento Bee | Nov. 19, 2014
Barring a stock market slump that drags down the state’s economy, California budgets will run surpluses through the end of the decade even as temporary tax increases phase out over the coming years, the Legislature’s nonpartisan fiscal analyst said Wednesday.

California schools, community colleges could get another $2 billion

LA Times | Nov. 19, 2014
California schools and community colleges could receive $2 billion in new funds as the state collects more revenue than expected, according to a report from the Legislature's budget advisor.

Copying off the test: For-profit colleges may benefit from a City College win
SF Weekly | Nov. 18, 2014
The courtroom drama to keep City College of San Francisco open is often viewed as a moral battle: The college artery pumps essential firefighters, mechanics, chefs, nurses, and plumbers into the body of this city.

CCSF trustees deserve to be reinstated now

San Francisco Examiner | Nov. 17, 2014
The California Community Colleges Board of Governors will consider a plan to reinstate City College of San Francisco's board of trustees at its meeting today. The plan outlines a process that will take 12 to 18 months to fully restore the trustees' powers. CCSF supporters will be there to demand the trustees' immediate return.

Advocates want art incorporated into Common Core

Capital Public Radio | Nov. 17, 2014
9-year-old Lillian Sanchez bounced around a Sacramento meeting room in a long pink skirt and a ruffled white top. She and her friends were performing a traditional Mexican dance at a Sacramento conference on arts in education.

Board of Governors to discuss plan for restoring control to CCSF trustees

San Francisco Examiner | Nov. 16, 2014
For the first time since the board of trustees lost its power last year after City College of San Francisco's accreditation was threatened, a deadline has been recommended for restoring local control.

Plaintiff attorney in the landmark Vergara case in Twin Cities to talk about teacher tenure

Minneapolis Star Tribune | Nov. 14, 2014
When a judge ruled this summer that California's teacher tenure laws deprived minority students of an equal education, legal observers concluded that it was likely other states could see similar lawsuits, particularly those where efforts to scale back tenure have failed.

Education secretary checks in on Common Core

U-T San Diego | Nov. 13, 2014
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan toured Angier Elementary School in San Diego on Thursday to get a firsthand look at the new Common Core academic standards that went into effect in California and most states this year.

Senate leader offers alternative to UC tuition hike proposal
LA Times | Nov. 13, 2014
Concerned that a surge in out-of-state students at the University of California may put residents at a disadvantage, Senate leader Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) on Thursday called for UC administrators to significantly boost tuition for nonresidents.

Student borrowing is down as tuition rises more slowly, study finds
LA Times | Nov. 13, 2014
Challenging the widely held fears that student debt continues to grow monstrously, new data show some financial good news for college students, particularly for those in California.

Cal State trustees approve budget, pay raises
LA Times | Nov. 13, 2014
California State University trustees approved a new budget Thursday for the 23-campus system and boosted the pay of top executives. The trustees also heard from students about campus fees but decisions on those won't be made until January.

School groups ask to delay API scores
EdSource | Nov. 12, 2014
The State Board of Education, as expected, voted Thursday to move ahead in the spring with the new Smarter Balanced tests on the Common Core State Standards while leaving open, for now, the decision on what to do with the test results.

Accountability plans should start with focus on Common Core
EdSource | Nov. 12, 2014
A couple of years ago, I began getting calls from my daughter’s school asking me to pick her up from the office. She would tell her teacher that she had a tummy ache, get sent to the office and ask the school secretary to call her daddy to come pick her up before she threw up.

As UC regents debate tuition hike, Brown may hold sway
LA Times | Nov. 12, 2014
The UC regents begin deliberations next week on a proposal to raise tuition by as much as 5% over each of the next five years. And although each member ostensibly has an equal vote, one may well have the strongest sway on public opinion and UC finances: Gov. Jerry Brown.

Students to protest student success fees
LA Times | Nov. 12, 2014
Dozens of California State University students who say they're already being squeezed too tightly by college costs are planning a rally to oppose campus-based fees at a meeting of trustees Thursday in Long Beach.

CCSF trustees may not return to power until 2016
SF Gate | Nov. 11, 2014
The elected Board of Trustees for City College of San Francisco, stripped of power in 2013, would have to wait until July 2016 before regaining full authority under a new plan from the state chancellor for California Community Colleges.

Study: Close screening process can improve teacher hires
Education Week | Nov. 11, 2014
Districts could boost their ability to hire teachers who help students learn more and who stay on the job longer by improving their screening techniques, a newly released working paper concludes.

Approach to fractions seen as key shift in Common standards
Education Week | Nov. 10, 2014
For many elementary teachers, fractions have traditionally sprung to mind lessons involving pizzas, pies, and chocolate bars, among other varieties of "wholes" that can be shared. But in what many experts are calling one of the biggest shifts associated with the Common Core State Standards for mathematics, more teachers are now being asked to emphasize fractions as points on a number line, rather than just parts of a whole, to underscore their relationships to integers.

Common Core unscathed in California elections
EdSource | Nov. 7, 2014
The Common Core State Standards, the principal reform now underway in California schools, emerged unscathed from the state’s fall electoral battles, including one of the most combative races for state superintendent of public instruction in decades.

Opinions differ on impact of Tuck’s campaign
EdSource | Nov. 6, 2014
In the hours since Marshall Tuck’s daunting but failed effort to unseat incumbent State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, education and political observers have reached different conclusions about the election and its significance.

UC faces opposition from Brown on tuition increase proposal
Sacramento Bee | Nov. 6, 2014
The University of California will likely face serious opposition in implementing its plan to raise tuition by up to 5 percent annually over the next five years, not only from students, but also from Gov. Jerry Brown, who has tied increased budget funding for the system to a four-year tuition freeze.

New L.A. student records system badly mishandled, report concludes
LA Times | Nov. 6, 2014
The rollout of a new student records system for Los Angeles schools was problematic at just about every level, according to a consultant’s report released Thursday.

UC proposes steady tuition hikes
LA Times | Nov. 6, 2014
For the first time in four years, UC leaders are proposing tuition hikes — as much as 5% in each of the next five years — to help cover rising costs and to expand the enrollment of California students.

Gov. Jerry Brown, students decry proposed UC tuition hikes
LA Times | Nov. 6, 2014
A University of California proposal to increase tuition by as much as 5% in each of the next five years drew sharp opposition Thursday from Gov. Jerry Brown, top state legislative leaders and student activists, ending three years of relative peace over the cost of public higher education in the state.

California Democrats fight over union label
SF Gate | Nov. 5, 2014
The simplistic narrative of California politics is that it’s solidly blue, and getting bluer. Indeed, Republicans have not won a statewide race since 2006, and registration has dropped below 30 percent in the nation’s most populous state.

Parents attend school to help students with Common Core math
Education World | Nov. 3, 2014
As Education World reported recently, parents have had some concerns about Common Core math. In response, some schools across the country are teaching parents Common Core standards, so it is easier for them to help their children at home.

Panel that rejected CCSF appeal over accreditation had ties to commission
SF Gate | Nov. 3, 2014
Four people on the independent panel that rejected City College of San Francisco’s appeal of the 2013 decision to revoke its accreditation had ties to the commission that made that decision, a witness testified Friday under questioning from a San Francisco city attorney trying to prove bias against the school.

Live testimony in CCSF trial concludes; both sides to make closing arguments next month
San Francisco Examiner | Nov. 3, 2014
Live testimony came to an end Friday in the trial that could save City College of San Francisco from closure by its accreditors.

When will school reform become a wedge issue for Democrats?
Sacramento Bee | Nov. 1, 2014
Before an audience primarily of African Americans at the Guild Theater near where he grew up in Oak Park, Mayor Kevin Johnson invoked the 15th Amendment right to vote, spoke of economic empowerment and praised Marshall Tuck.

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