In the News Archive: July 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS 

Community college accreditation commission needs more accountability: Guest commentary
LA Daily News | July 8, 2015
The nine colleges comprising the Los Angeles Community College District are currently gearing up for their accreditation review. Accredited status allows students to receive credit and take out federal loans to attend and assures educational quality and accountability to the public. 

Teaching moment: Will Sacramento school college accreditors?
Capital & Main | July 7, 2015
If it becomes law, a reform bill now in the state legislature will mark a milestone in the two-year effort to rein in the secretive but powerful private organization responsible for accrediting California’s 112 public community colleges. The target of Assembly Bill 1397 is the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC), which was recently thwarted from terminating the accreditation of the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), mostly for issues stemming from the academically high-rated school’s Great Recession-battered finances. 

Mayors hear biased view of California court decision vs. teacher tenure
People’s World | July 7, 2015
In the landmark case of Vergara v. California, state Superior Court Judge Rolf Treu ruled last year that tenure and seniority laws in public education had robbed California students of their constitutional right to a high quality public education.

Report from charter group suggests English learners do better at charters
LA School Report | July 7, 2015
English learner students are performing better in charter schools than in traditional schools, according to a new report released by the California Charter Schools Association.

Court may put school status quo under siege
San Diego Union-Tribune | July 2, 2015
The U.S. Supreme Court’s announcement this week that it would hear the Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association case this fall offers tremendous hope for better public schools and a healthier state political climate. Rebecca Friedrichs, an elementary schoolteacher for 27 years in Anaheim, nine other state teachers and the Christian Educators Association International are challenging the state law requiring them to pay dues to the CTA that the union uses to fight for many causes that Friedrichs opposes – starting with extreme job protections and efforts to control local school boards by electing union allies.

 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

Pasadena City College’s accreditation placed on probation
Pasadena Star-News
A regional accrediting commission has placed Pasadena City College on probation after reviewing the way the school is run.
Bay Area school trustees urge Legislature: Repeal cap on reserves
Contra Costa Times | July 9, 2015
Several Bay Area school board members on Thursday urged state legislators to repeal a cap on school district reserve funds that could be triggered whenever the state puts money into its own rainy day fund for schools.
Accrediting commission sanctions 4 East Bay community colleges
SF Gate | July 8, 2015
Four community colleges in Alameda County have been placed on a watch list for accreditation problems by the same agency that threatened to revoke accreditation from City College of San Francisco.
Common Core test results due next month: ‘It’s not going to be pretty’
Modesto Bee | July 7, 2015
After a year with no results to, in essence, test the test, this summer there will be numbers and ratings winging their way to parents’ mailboxes.

Who's funding Campbell Brown's education news site?
Inside Philanthrophy | July 6, 2015
Former news anchor and current education reform advocate Campbell Brown has found a way to combine her interests in journalism and education reform with her new venture, a nonprofit newssite focused on K-12 education.

Are test scores proving fears about Common-Core high school math correct?
Education Week | July 6, 2015
As I wrote last week, Smarter Balanced test scores released by Idaho, Oregon, and Washington state show that students are largely beating states' projections for student performance—except for on the high school math tests, where students in all three states fell short of their predicted performance.

CCSF to meet with accrediting commission over possible reversal of 2013 decision
San Francisco Examiner | July 6, 2015
Leaders with City College of San Francisco on Wednesday will ask the school’s accrediting commission to reverse its 2013 decision to revoke the school’s accreditation, though it’s unknown what impact that move would have.

Legislators take aim at Proposition 13 loophole
SF Gate | July 6, 2015
San Francisco Assemblyman Phil Ting calls it one of the most vexing issues in the state Capitol, a loophole in California’s Proposition 13 that allows commercial property buyers to wiggle out of paying higher taxes.

Marriage ruling may boost school climate for LGBT families and students
EdSource | July 6, 2015
When the U.S. Supreme Court issued a major civil rights decision on marriage in Loving v. Virginia in 1967, striking down a state law banning interracial marriage, Alameda Unified teacher Gene Kahane was a 3rd-grader in Richmond, California, and didn’t hear about it. News of social change travels faster and farther now – and almost immediately into the classroom.

California advocates still pushing to unionize child care providers
Sacramento Bee | July 5, 2015
Pamela Sharp’s day starts at 5:30 a.m., when she gets up to make breakfast for the children she watches all day in her home. She’s open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., five days a week.

‘Project-based learning and Common Core are a natural fit’
EdSource | July 5, 2015
Tyler Graff is the incoming principal at the Claire Lilienthal alternative school in San Francisco Unified. Previously, he was principal of Stevenson Elementary, a public school in Mountain View, where he kicked off a project-based learning initiative in 2012.

Debt forgiveness and liquidation
Inside Higher Ed | July 2, 2015
The messy dismantling of Corinthian Colleges is moving through a federal bankruptcy court, as a judge mulls whether to halt loan repayments for up to 350,000 former students and the defunct for-profit chain seeks the court’s approval for the fire sale of its remaining assets – including trademarks, furniture and even old diplomas and typewriters.

Arne Duncan 'thrilled' to close Corinthian Colleges, not so ready to help its former students
Huffington Post | July 2, 2015
The Department of Education was “thrilled” to shut down the for-profit chain Corinthian Colleges Inc., Education Secretary Arne Duncan declared Wednesday -- a claim that stands in sharp contrast with his department's frantic efforts last year to save the company.

State budget offers ‘epic opportunity’ for California community colleges
EdSource | July 2, 2015
The budget deal agreed to by Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature last month has record increases for education, particularly community colleges. Some call it a windfall. Others call it catch up from deep budget slashing during the recession.

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: May 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS 

In San Diego Unified, pension tsunami is nearing shore
U-T San Diego | May 28, 2015
Stories about budget problems at local school districts have been a staple in California since the revenue crisis hit Sacramento in 2008. This eased somewhat after voters approved Proposition 30 in 2012, imposing temporary income tax and sales tax hikes to boost school funding. Now we’re hearing more good news about state education funding soaring in fiscal 2015-16 because of revenue running sharply higher than expected, thanks primarily to Silicon Valley’s latest boom.

State taxes may go down – and up
The OC Register | May 24, 2015
Is there a tax cut in your future? Could be. A consensus is forming that, barring a big recession, the $7 billion yearly Proposition 30 state tax increase voters passed in 2012 will be allowed to expire at the end of 2018. 


Editorial: No reason to make the temporary tax a permanent one
Chico Enterprise-Record | May 23, 2015
If you believe Gov. Jerry Brown’s words and his budget team’s projections, something miraculous
could happen in California next year. A temporary tax could actually prove to be temporary. 


Free College?
On Point | May 21, 2015
Another college academic year down, another huge whack of college debt for young Americans. $1.2 trillion in college debt now in this country. Absolutely massive. The only kind of consumer debt not headed downward since the recession. In fact, student loans are up 84 percent. Critics says it’s a yoke on the necks of a whole generation and more. Now there’s a call – and legislation on the table – to make public higher education, college tuition, free. Not cheaper, but free. Like Germany and Finland and more. Would that be wise? Crazy? Up next, On Point: College for free. 


CalSTRS finally allowed to cash out of controversial gun investment

Fox 40 | May 18, 2015
After two-and-a-half years of pressure from its members, the California State Teachers’ Retirement System is about to do something it’s been trying to do since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. 


Anti-union groups target California teachers
People’s World | May 18, 2015
Pro-corporate education anti-union groups have taken aim at California teachers unions with two separate lawsuits - one of which would strip away the right for unions to collect "fair pay" or "agency fees" from non-members; and another which argues the right of workers to be represented by the union, and to vote in union elections, but to not have to join the union or pay agency fees. 


Brown believes state’s revenue will be healthy without Prop. 30 taxes
LA Daily News | May 17, 2015
When Gov. Jerry Brown unveiled his revised state budget late last week, the news that California is swimming in black ink rightfully stole the show.


CalSTRS, others can cash out of gun investment
Sacramento Bee | May 15, 2015
A month after protesters demanded that CalSTRS dump its investment in a firearms manufacturer tied to the mass shooting at a Connecticut school, it appears they will get their wish. 


Education groups generally like Brown’s revised budget plan
KPCC | May 15, 2015
Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal increasing funding by billions for education from a record $115.3 billion budget plan for the next fiscal year drew mostly applause after it was unveiled on Thursday. 


Governor Brown proposes record $115.3 billion budget
KPCC | May 14, 2015
Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday proposed a record $115.3 billion California spending plan that will send more money to public schools, freeze in-state undergraduate tuition and establish a new state tax credit for the working poor.


Revised estimate for K-12 spending: $6 billion more next year
EdSource | May 14, 2015
Spending for K-12 schools in the coming year will be $6 billion more than Gov. Jerry Brown proposed just five months ago, raising per-student spending $3,000 – 45 percent – from what it was four years ago, according to the revised state budget that the governor released on Thursday.


Billions in extra education funds brings praise from around state
LA School Report | May 14, 2015
Gov. Jerry Brown’s revised budget, which directs billions more toward schools over the next few years, has brought smiles to the faces of educational leaders around the state. 


Rapid response: Gov. Jerry Brown’s revised budget
Sacramento Bee | May 14, 2015
“The Assembly has made clear our budget priorities include reducing poverty, restoring funding for schools and early childhood education, improving higher education funding, building reserves and paying down debt, and providing a down payment for transportation infrastructure. The Governor’s May Budget revision makes significant progress in these areas, and we look forward to working with the Senate and the Governor in the coming weeks to find ways to improve the budget and make vital investments for California’s future.”


K-12 funding increase more than $3,000 per student over 2011-12 levels
San Jose Mercury News | May 14, 2015
As expected, Gov. Jerry Brown's revised state budget includes lots of good news for schools. It increases K-12 spending $6.1 billion above what was projected in January, based largely on higher-than-anticipated state revenues, boosting per student spending by $3,000 over 2011-12 levels, and rising 45 percent over four years. 


Unions target Prop. 13 again
OC Register | May 13, 2015
Public employee unions are leading a charge to take on what has long been considered a “third rail” of California politics: Proposition 13. The Make It Fair coalition, led by public unions such as the Service Employees International Union, California Teachers Association and California Federation of Teachers, proposes increasing property taxes for commercial properties.


Déjà vu or something new? California seeks labor-management cooperation
Education Week | May 13, 2015
A quarter century ago Julia Koppich and I synthesized the experience of labor relations radicals in A Union of Professionals, case studies of districts and unions that were trying to redefine teacher labor relations by moving from industrial unionism toward what we dubbed "professional unionism." Late last week, I observed California districts and unions getting energized by some of the same possibilities.


EDITORIAL: Unions target Prop. 13 again
Press Enterprise | May 13, 2015
Public employee unions are leading a charge to take on what has long been considered a “third rail” of California politics: Proposition 13. The Make It Fair coalition, led by public unions such as the Service Employees International Union, California Teachers Association and California Federation of Teachers, proposes increasing property taxes for commercial properties.

 

Group behind Vergara case says website was hackedGroup behind Vergara case says website was hacked
LA School Report | May 11, 2015
The non-profit group behind the Vergara lawsuit, Students Matter, said its website was hacked over the weekend to display “vulgar and disgusting language.”

 

Teachers unions battle court ruling on tenure laws
SF Gate | May 10, 2015
The fate of nearly a century of job-security protections for California teachers is in the hands of a state appellate court, which is preparing to review a judge’s bombshell ruling that found tenure and seniority laws protect incompetent instructors, serve no educational purpose and, in particular, discriminate against poor and minority students. 

Suit against teachers unions isn't about free speech but silencing members
LA Times | May 8, 2015
Attacks on public employee unions, especially teachers unions, have become a permanent feature of the political landscape. But you'd be hard pressed to find one as incoherent and dishonest as a lawsuit filed last month in federal court in Los Angeles against six California and national teachers unions. 


Teachers unions file appeal of Vergara decision
Heartland Institute | May 7, 2015

The California Federation of Teachers and the California Teachers Association filed an appeal to the landmark Vergara decision on May 1. A local CBS affiliate reports the unions are challenging the ruling for lacking "legal or factual justification."

SD labor forum attracts statewide school, union leaders
U-T San Diego | May 7, 2015
Top officials from school districts and teachers unions throughout California will meet with state education leaders in San Diego this weekend for a rare, invitation-only conference that aims to promote collaboration between labor and management. 

California doesn't enlist in teacher wars; seeks labor-management partnership
Education Week | May 7, 2015
California is taking an exceptional labor relations path. In Republican-dominated states, declaring outright war on teacher unions has been a political best seller, and ambitious governors, such as Wisconsin's Scott Walker, see the drubbing of teachers as a ticket to the White House. In more traditionally Democratic states, such as New York, a war of percentages over testing diverts the state from what is more important business. California chose not to enlist in the teacher wars, and it is hoping for a peace dividend. 

Teachers unions appeal Vergara
Fox & Hounds | May 7, 2015
On May Day (how fitting!) the California Teachers Association and the California Federation of Teachers filed their appeal of the Vergara decision. In that 2014 ruling, Superior Court Judge Rolf Treu struck down California’s teacher tenure, layoff and dismissal laws, claiming that they deny students access to a quality public education, especially those from poor and minority families.

Teachers' unions throw students under the bus
Economics 21 | May 7, 2015
In many cities with abysmal school systems, teacher firings are exceedingly rare, due to powerful teachers' unions. In New York City and Chicago, barely 1 in 1,000 teachers loses his job for poor performance.

Calif. legislation would require schools to negotiate evaluations
Education Week | May 6, 2015
The Democratic leadership in both the California Senate and Assembly is backing bills to restructure teacher evaluation, bring it within the scope of collective bargaining, and connect it to test scores. The debate rekindles a historic divide and raises the question of whether either teachers or school administrators are prepared for the consequences of the new law.

Commentary: Chavez's failed bill proves teachers' unions have control
Seaside Courier | May 4, 2015
Former Oceanside City Councilman Rocky Chavez is learning, the hard way, just how tough it can be as a Republican in a state dominated, and run, by Democrats. 

The Grove School, Competitive Edge Charter plan events this week
Redlands Daily Facts | May 2, 2015
The Grove School in Redlands and Competitive Edge Charter Academy in Yucaipa offer learning experiences not typically found in traditional public schools. 

State, teacher unions file briefs in tenure-ruling appeal
San Francisco Chronicle | May 1, 2015
Attorneys for the state and California's powerful teachers unions argued in a filing Friday that a landmark California teacher tenure case was flawed and should be overturned because no evidence was presented showing the disputed statutes are the cause of educational inequalities. 

State teacher unions file appeal in Vergara case, calling it ‘baseless’
LA School Report | May 1, 2015
The state’s two teachers unions — the California Teachers Association and the California Federation of Teachers — filed their appeal today in the landmark education case they lost last year, Vergara v. California.

AB 925 lets debt collectors, subprime lenders, others secretly record phone calls
Satellite PR News | May 1, 2015
A coalition of California consumer, privacy, senior, student, labor and immigrant advocates urge the defeat of Assembly Bill 925 (Evan Low, D-Campbell), which would eliminate a longstanding prohibition against secret recordings of consumer cell phone calls by subprime lenders, debt collectors, student loan companies, hotels, health care providers, retailers and other businesses. Key backers of AB 925 include AT&T, Verizon and high-tech corporate lobbyists.

Democrats kill Republican bills on teacher tenure, firing
Sacramento Bee | April 29, 2015
A legislative committee on Wednesday rejected Republican education bills that would have overhauled teacher tenure and firing rules in response to a federal judge striking down California’s teacher employment laws.

In major anti-labor case, union-busters no longer even pretend unions don’t benefit workers
In These Times | April 29, 2015
April Bain is a high school math teacher in Los Angeles, and a dues-paying member of her union, Los Angeles Teachers United. She has benefited from this membership, and indeed claims that “everybody has a horror story of a teacher that needed their union.” She describes a personal experience of conflict with her principal in which having a union behind her made her feel safe. “You felt safe. You kind of felt like, okay, we can do what’s right here and we’ll be protected,” she has stated. 

School boards and administrators oppose teacher evaluation bills
EdSource | April 28, 2015
The Legislature’s top Democrats have made a comprehensive rewrite of the law on teacher evaluations a priority this session. But a fundamental disagreement over granting teachers the power to negotiate all aspects of evaluations, including whether to use student test scores as a factor, could doom prospects for passage, as it has in the past.

City College battle prompts bills to rein in accreditation panel
SF Gate | April 26, 2015
As state officials sift through the aftermath of the near-closure of California’s largest public college, a San Francisco lawmaker is proposing to rein in the state’s only community college accreditation commission — though it’s not clear that the state has the authority to regulate the private, nonprofit commission. 

Elementary indoctrination
City Journal | April 24, 2015
To say California’s teachers’ unions wield outsize influence over state education policy is hardly novel. From setting tenure rules to rewriting dismissal statutes and blocking pension reforms, the California Teachers Association and the California Federation of Teachers roam the halls of the legislature like varsity all-stars. But less well known are the unions’ efforts to remake curriculum—and thereby influence the next generation of citizens and voters.

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS 

Union-led effort launched to change Prop 13, would make it easier to raise taxes on commercial properties, not residential properties; opposition swiftly surfaces from business interests
LB Report | May 8, 2015
A union-lead coalition of groups, calling itself "Make It Fair," has launched an effort to change Proposition 13 to make it easier to raise taxes on what it calls commercial properties -- mainly industrial, retail and office properties -- while not affecting owner-occupied homes, residential rental properties and agricultural land.

New Prop. 13 reform effort could succeed by splitting business interests
Capital & Main | May 7, 2015
A broad-based coalition today launched an effort to reform Proposition 13, the 1978 law passed by voters that many critics believe imposed a fiscal stranglehold on the Golden State.

Union-led coalition launches campaign to change Proposition 13
Sacramento Bee | May 7, 2015
A coalition of public employee unions and other liberal groups, including many churches, launched a campaign Thursday to alter Proposition 13, California’s iconic property tax limit, and raise billions of dollars by hiking taxes on commercial property.

Opinion: Finally, war on Prop. 13 breaks out
Sacramento Bee | May 7, 2015
A political war over taxes that’s been brewing for nearly four decades finally erupted Thursday – maybe. A union-led coalition of liberal groups launched a campaign to change Proposition 13, the iconic 1978 property tax limit, seeking billions more in revenue from commercial and industrial property owners.

The beginning of the end of for-profit colleges
ThinkProgress | May 7, 2015
Education Management Corporation or EDMC, announced it will gradually shut down 15 of 52 campuses of The Art Institutes, leaving 5,400 students without a college.

VUSD leaders heap praise on Dean Vogel, president of CTA
The Reporter | May, 7, 2015
President of the Vacaville Teachers Association, Moira McSweeney suggested a newspaper headline about Dean Vogel could read “local boy does good.”

After Corinthian, two more for-profit college chains announce closings
Fortune | May 7, 2015
For the for-profit college industry, the knocks just keep coming. Corinthian Colleges, once one of the nation’s largest for-profit chains, grabbed headlines late last month when it announced it would close its remaining 28 campuses, displacing roughly 16,000 students. The announcement came less than two weeks after the Department of Education announced a $30 million fine against the institution for misrepresenting student job placement data.

Schools ‘big winners’ from surging state revenues
EdSource | May 7, 2015
As Gov. Jerry Brown prepares to release his revised state budget for the coming fiscal year next week, educators around the state are looking forward to hearing about the additional funds they will receive, a dramatic departure from the bleak years of the recession, when they braced themselves for further cuts.

Students occupy CCSF administration building for several hours
SF Gate | May 6, 2015
About 200 students occupied the administration building at City College of San Francisco for several hours on Wednesday, demanding that program cuts be reversed and that the special trustee running the school be removed.

CCSF students occupy administration building, demand special trustee’s resignation
San Francisco Appeal | May 6, 2015
A group of City College of San Francisco students occupied an administration building this afternoon and said they intended to stay until their demands are met or they are forced out, a student organizer said.

Congresswoman Speier urges federal oversight of for-profit colleges in wake of Corinthian closures
San Francisco Appeal | May 6, 2015
Congresswoman Jackie Speier met with Bay Area college administrators this morning to discuss the lack of federal oversight that led up to the abrupt closure of for-profit college franchise Corinthian Colleges Inc. and its 28 campuses, including Heald College in San Francisco, last week.

Loopholes in Prop. 13 let corporations off the hook
Sacramento Bee | May 6, 2015
Californians having been living with scarcity for so long that it’s become natural for us to assume that our teachers will scrape together whatever they can for our classrooms, that libraries will be open only a couple of hours a day, that our communities won’t have what they need. We shrug our shoulders and accept that it’s OK for thousands of our roads and bridges to be structurally deficient, for our kids to have no place to go after school, for emergency response times to stretch longer and longer.

Students get piece of the action after seeking a say in budget
EdSource | May 5, 2015
Last fall, high school sophomores Stephanie Perez and Ismael Mauricio joined a contingent of students at a State Board of Education meeting demanding that students get a say in how school districts spend money.

Opt-out parents have a point
US News & World Report | May 5, 2015
A new phrase has rapidly become familiar in schooling: "opt-out." Across the nation, hundreds of thousands of students are refusing to take state reading and math tests, usually at the behest of their parents. In New York, 200,000 students have opted out of this spring’s state tests. Some New York districts have had more than half of their students refuse to take the tests. Polling suggests that half of all New York voters say they support the families that have opted out of the tests. Meanwhile, more localized opt-out pushes are bubbling up in states including New Jersey, Colorado and California.

For-profit Corinthian Colleges files for bankruptcy
Washington Post | May 4, 2015
Corinthian Colleges, once one of the country’s largest career college chains, on Monday filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, a week after shutting down its remaining 28 campuses.

Updated: State board again to pursue waiver from No Child Left Behind
EdSource | May 4, 2015
The State Board of Education isn’t giving up on the hope that U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan might grant California at least a partial waiver from the No Child Left Behind law that he has given to 43 other states.

Corinthian Colleges is out of money and drowning in debt
CNN | May 4, 2015
Twenty years after opening its doors, Corinthian Colleges has officially gone bust. The for-profit education company filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday.

Corinthian Colleges files bankruptcy to facilitate wind-down
Reuters | May 4, 2015
Corinthian Colleges Inc, the for-profit college operator hamstrung by federal and state investigations, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on Monday, about a week after announcing it would shutter its remaining campuses and cease operations.

Why the movement to opt out of Common Core tests is a big deal
Washington Post | May 3, 2015
The movement among parents to refuse to allow their children to take Common Core-aligned standardized tests has been growing in a number of states, as recent Answer Sheet posts have chronicled (here and here, for example). As opt-out numbers have grown, so too has reaction from officials who argue that frequent testing is valuable and that school districts could lose federal funds if too many students refuse to take the test (a threat that appears to be based on shaky ground.) Though testing supporters have attempted to minimize the importance and impact of the opt-out movement, it is having a big impact, as explained in the following post by award-winning New York Principal Carol Burris.

"You're gonna rape me?" demands a Democrat whose teacher tenure law got killed
LA Weekly | May 1, 2015
It was a busy week in Sacramento, city of trees, where state legislators were frantically jamming their bills through committees to make a May 1 deadline by which all proposed laws must sent to various fiscal committees to live another day.

State panel blocks teacher evaluation, tenure bills
U-T San Diego | April 30, 2015
An Assembly committee on Wednesday shelved a handful of bills aimed at overhauling teacher tenure, evaluation and firing policies, including a measure by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego.

Californians embrace Common Core
San Francisco Chronicle | April 30, 2015
If you’ve tuned in to some of the national chatter aroud Common Core, you might assume that updating our education standards to meet the needs of today’s students is controversial. It’s true that in many states it’s been a lightning rod for conflict and political posturing, even with Common Core’s clear benefits to students and strong support from education, business and community leaders.

Popular LA preschool language program is targeted once again
EdSource | April 30, 2015
A popular and well-regarded preschool program in Los Angeles, which was created more than three decades ago to help children and their parents in low-income, racially and ethnically isolated neighborhoods of the city, would be shut down over the next two years under a district proposal to cut costs.

Jury finds Cal State acted reasonably in 2009 tuition hikes
LA Times | April 30, 2015
A jury Thursday found that California State University did not act unfairly when trustees voted to impose fee increases on students twice within a few months.

What’s not on California’s education agenda – and should be
EdSource | April 29, 2015
California is in the process of implementing a range of reforms, from the Local Control Funding Formula, the Common Core State Standards and a new accountability system. What other reforms are needed to ensure that students succeed? Nonprofit education leaders speak out on what reforms they think should be added to California’s agenda. Other voices will be added as part of this ongoing series. Please let us know if you want to contribute.

Despite progress, still too few Latinos admitted to UC, report says
LA Times | April 29, 2015
Despite progress in gaining admission to the University of California, Latino students in the state still are underrepresented compared with their overall population, and are heavily concentrated at three of the system’s 10 campuses, according to a new report.

State vaccination bill passes Senate committee
EdSource | April 28, 2015
The issue of mandatory vaccinations roiled a legislative hearing in Sacramento on Tuesday for the third time this month, and for the third time, state Senate committee members approved the proposed state law that would restrict exemptions to required school vaccinations

Hundreds protest S.F. archbishop’s push on morality clauses
SF Gate | April 28, 2015
Hundreds of Catholic-school teachers and supporters gathered outside the San Francisco Archdiocese on Monday afternoon waving rainbow banners and preaching acceptance of gays and lesbians — all in protest of efforts by the archbishop to require employees to embrace church opposition to “homosexual relations,” “fornication” and other “gravely evil” sexual activities.

Project-based learning on the rise under the Common Core
EdSource | April 27, 2015
The young-adult novel “Hatchet” – about a boy who learns to live in the wild after surviving a plane crash – has been a staple of elementary-school English classes for years. But this year Sara Siebert taught it with a twist.

Education bills squelch any reform agenda
U-T San Diego | April 27, 2015
Several years ago, TV host John Stossel held up a chart in tiny print detailing the long and complex process for firing a teacher in New York City. The audience was guffawing by the time he worked his way to the bottom of the second page — at which point he revealed that there were even more pages to this maddeningly long process.

SanFran Archbishop weighs 'adjustments' to teacher contracts
National Catholic Register | April 27, 2015
On April 27, the Archdiocese of San Francisco signaled that it was prepared to make "adjustments" to advance negotiaions with the local Catholic teachers' union. The statement marked an afternoon of protests against the archdiocese.

AM Alert: Darrell Steinberg returns to Capitol to promote mental health legislation
Sacramento Bee | April 27, 2015
Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San Francisco, will be on the east side of the Capitol at 11 a.m. to urge passage of legislation to overhaul the accreditation process for California community colleges. Last year, a scathing state audit slammed the accrediting agency for acting inconsistently and without sufficient public disclosure, particularly in the ongoing case of City College of San Francisco, which had its accreditation revoked in July 2013. The two bills, one of which would open the accrediting agency’s closed meetings, will get their first hearing before the Assembly Higher Education Committee, 1:30 p.m. in Room 126.

San Francisco archbishop: I expected controversy, but not to this degree
Crux | April 27, 2015
Many Roman Catholics in this city named for humble St. Francis are sparring with each other on social media and in letters to the editor over one figure: Their leader in the faith, Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone.

Common Core tests well under way
EdSource | April 27, 2015
With less than two months of instruction time left before summer vacation for most California schools, roughly half of the 3.2 million students expected to take the first online tests aligned with the Common Core State Standards have begun to do so, the California Department of Education reported Monday.

"I want education, not indoctrination": Catholic teachers and students protest archdiocese
SF Weekly | April 27, 2015
Over 100 Catholic teachers, students, and labor activists rallied outside the San Francisco Archdiocese Chancery this afternoon, in protest of what teachers at Bay Area Catholic schools are calling attacks on their rights as workers.

Time for state's leaders to tackle teacher tenure
U-T San Diego | April 25, 2015
Nearly a year ago, a state Superior Court ruled in favor of nine students who brought a suit against California for violating their constitutional right to a quality education. The testimony of the students from racially and economically diverse backgrounds who brought the case laid bare our troubled and inequitable educational system, a system that continues to allow teachers to flounder and students to fail.

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: March 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS 

State lawmakers call for deeper regulation of charter schools
LA School Report | March 26, 2015
Four Democratic California lawmakers joined forces yesterday to promote new bills aimed at creating more stringent regulation of the state’s charter schools.

McGuire’s bipartisan career and job skills bill passes Senate Education Committee
Lake County News | March 26, 2015
Sen. Mike McGuire was joined by teachers, manufacturers, the farm bureau, and members of the building trades Wednesday morning when his bi-partisan legislation that would expand career and job skills in public middle and high schools advanced through the Senate Education Committee with a 7-0 vote.

Teachers support crackdown on charter schools through legislation
Breitbart News | March 26, 2015
Democrats in the California State Assembly, prodded along by their financial backers at the California Teachers Association, California Federation of Teachers, and California Labor Federation, announced their goal on Wednesday of gutting the state’s charter school system. Their strategy: force charter schools to operate as non-profit organizations.

California teachers fight to save their union and the schools
People’s World | March 25, 2015
Unionized California teachers are among the many categories of workers nationwide whose unions are under attack by anti-labor lawmakers and judges seeking to kill unions by draining them of their financial lifeblood. The teachers are saying, however, that they won't shrink from the fight to preserve their union's right to collect fees for the representation services it provides and that they will continue their ongoing fight for quality education for everyone.

California teachers unions promote charter school bills
Sacramento Bee | March 25, 2015
California’s politically potent teachers unions are promoting bills requiring charter schools to hold open meetings and to consider all applicants while cracking down on for-profit charter operators.

Southern California legislators call for charter school reform
San Bernardino County Sun | March 25, 2015
California legislators took to the steps of the State Capitol on Wednesday to call for reform of the state’s charter school law, including requiring them to be run as non-profits.

Jacque Robinson continues historic run for City of Pasadena Mayor
Los Angeles Sentinel | March 12, 2015
Jacque Robinson became one of the youngest elected officials in the history of the City of Pasadena when she won her City Council race at the age of 28, and Tuesday March 10th she pushed fellow council member Terry Tornek into an April 21st runoff to become the second Black woman to serve as Mayor of Pasadena. 

California’s public education charade
U-T San Diego | March 12, 2015
The importance of a decent education to success in life has never been more plain. This is why Gov. Jerry Brown has spoken of the urgency of California doing a better job in educating millions of minority students who struggle with English and who are much more prone to drop out with few job skills.

National Adjunct Action Day
The Mesa Press | March 10, 2015
National Adjunct Action Day made its way to San Diego Mesa College on Feb. 25 as staff, students, faculty, and supporters all rallied up to speak out about the growing adjunct crisis in America.

Negotiate now or face a strike, say L.A. teachers
People’s World | March 3, 2015
Red shirts filled Grant Park last Thursday, across the street from City Hall here, in a rally of educators, students, and parents. "District greed has got to go! Call the school board and let them know," people at the rally chanted. 


EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

Despite state mediator, LAUSD and teachers still $774 million and an evaluation system apart
LA Daily News | March 26, 2015
A referee from California’s top labor authority proved little help Thursday in the fray between Los Angeles’ school district and teachers union.

“We have a clearer pathway for student learning” with the Common Core
EdSource | March 26, 2015
Gabriela Mafi, superintendent of the Garden Grove Unified School District, is a Latina raised in urban Los Angeles. She is a first-generation college graduate who received her master’s and doctoral degrees in Urban Educational Leadership from the University of Southern California. She has been superintendent in Garden Grove, in northern Orange County, since the summer of 2013, after a career that included serving as a K-12 teacher, an adjunct college professor, and an assistant superintendent of secondary education.

Efforts to expand California university systems are growing
LA Times | March 25, 2015
The death last week of former University of California system president and UC Irvine chancellor Jack W. Peltason at 91 elicited warm memories of the modest political scientist who achieved high positions in American academia without losing his sense of humor. He also was known for his role in helping to build new university campuses from scratch and growing them to maturity.

We need resources and time ‘to show that we can improve’
EdSource | March 25, 2015
Craig Wheaton, superintendent of the Visalia Unified School District, talked with EdSource about some of the challenges and encouraging signs in his district. The following are excerpts from the interview.

Cal State efficiencies save millions, but state funding still sought
LA Times | March 25, 2015
Smaller budgets and increased numbers of students are forcing California State University campuses to take far-reaching cost-cutting measures that are saving millions of dollars on technology, energy and operations, officials said Wednesday.

Overhaul urged to aid special education in California
Education Week | March 24, 2015
Members of a task force that spent two years studying special education in California used their final report to recommend sweeping changes to the state's entire pre-K-12 system in hopes of improving achievement for students with disabilities.

CSU administrators' pay gains outpace those for faculty, report says
LA Times | March 24, 2015
California State University administrators made significant gains in hiring and compensation over the last decade while faculty lost ground or failed to keep pace in both areas, according to a report released Tuesday by the California Faculty Assn.

New studies find that, for teachers, experience really does matter
Education Week | March 24, 2015
The notion that teachers improve over their first three or so years in the classroom and plateau thereafter is deeply ingrained in K-12 policy discussions, coming up in debate after debate about pay, professional development, and teacher seniority, among other topics.

San Francisco teachers' union describes 'great distress' among members
National Catholic Reporter | March 24, 2015
The executive board of the teachers' union representing the San Francisco archdiocese's four high schools sent a letter describing "great distress" and "significant division, discontent, doubt and fear" among its members to administrators of three of the four schools.*

Dates for new Common Core assessments vary by district
EdSource | March 23, 2015
Between now and mid-June, approximately 3.2 million California students will take new online tests aligned with the Common Core State Standards, marking a new era in California’s multi-decade efforts to establish an accountability system to assess student performance.

Proposition 30 closes spending gap between state and nation
EdSource | March 23, 2015
Revenue from temporary taxes from Proposition 30 has closed the K-12 spending gap between California and the national average by more than 60 percent, according to data released Monday by the California Budget and Policy Center, a nonprofit research organization.

What do Snoop Dogg and CalSTRS have in common?
Chief Investment Officer | March 13, 2015
The latest environmental, social, and governance-based divestment campaign has arisen not from college students, but rather the West Coast rapper Snoop Dogg.

Unraveling the church ban on gay sex
New York Times | March 12, 2015
Last month, Salvatore Cordileone, the archbishop of San Francisco, made controversial changes to a handbook for Catholic high school teachers in his jurisdiction. The changes included morals clauses, one of which forbids those teachers from publicly endorsing homosexual behavior. There are plausible legal and educational objections to this move. But there is a deeper issue, one that raises fundamental questions about Catholic teachings on homosexuality and other sexual matters.

Staten Island judge allows suit on teacher tenure to proceed
New York Times | March 12, 2015
Opponents of New York State’s teacher tenure laws won a small but important victory on Thursday, when a Staten Island judge allowed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of those rules to move forward. 

California gives extra year to adjust to Common Core tests
ABC News | March 12, 2015
California is giving schools at least one year to breathe easy before they are held accountable for results on new tests aligned to the Common Core standards. 

Strike chicken between LAUSD, UTLA; Pi Day at Millikan
LA School Report | March 12, 2015
Appearing before the LA Unified school board on Tuesday to respond to a district plan to send layoff notices to over 600 employees, UTLA President Alex Caputo-Pearl suggested that he sees a conspiratorial move by the board in response to UTLA’s seeking a new contract while threatening to strike. 

How to fix No Child Left Behind
EdSource | March 12, 2015
Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s commentary for EdSource last month, called “How Not to Fix No Child Left Behind,” consisted for the most part of mushy platitudes that must be measured against the realities of his actions over the past six years. 

Potential exists for ‘much richer and in-depth math experience’
EdSource | March 12, 2015
Math teacher Timothy Smith earned a 2014 California Teacher of the Year award and was chosen by Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson to be the state’s nominee for the National Teacher of the Year award. 

Public schools see windfall after $1-million lotto prize goes unclaimed
LA Times | March 12, 2015
California public schools just won the lottery -- sort of. The Powerball winner seen above failed to claim his $1-million prize by 5 p.m. Thursday, officials said. 

LAUSD approves sending layoff recommendations
NBC Southern California | March 11, 2015
The Los Angeles Unified School District board approved a recommendation Tuesday that will authorize sending layoff warning notices to 609 employees by March 15. The decision comes in the wake of a report indicating the school district is facing a nearly $160 million deficit. 

LAUSD doesn’t want to be held accountable for Common Core performance, but state may decide otherwise
LA Daily News | March 11, 2015
The California Board of Education was expected to decide Wednesday whether schools should be held accountable on the state’s performance index for student results in the new Common Core-aligned assessments. 

California suspends school accountability on Common Core
Christian Science Monitor | March 11, 2015
The California Board of Education suspended the state's school accountability system on Wednesday for one year to give teachers and students time to adjust to new standardized tests aligned with Common Core standards. 

California suspends school ratings for first year of Common Core test
KQED | March 11, 2015
Across California, kids this week are hunkering down over new standardized tests. In the future, these tests will help determine how we decide which schools are good and which aren’t. But this year schools and students are getting a break. 

'Vergara' decision emboldens state GOP
U-T San Diego | March 9, 2015
The late American Federation of Teachers President Al Shanker reputedly said that he'll start representing the interests of children “when schoolchildren start paying union dues.” The veracity of the quotation still is in dispute, but it often is repeated because it highlights a truth about teachers’ unions. 

Nevius: Catholic Church can’t win fight it’s picking with S.F.
San Francisco Chronicle | March 9, 2015
Supervisor Mark Farrell tried to be reasonable. Maybe that’s where he went wrong. At last week’s Board of Supervisors meeting, Farrell introduced a resolution pretty much to urge San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone to back off on the “morality clauses” he’s got his mind set on for local Catholic school teacher labor contracts and handbooks. 

Activists stage protest against archdiocese of San Francisco on International Women's Day
NBC Bay Area | March 9, 2015
Local activists have staged a protest against the Archdiocese of San Francisco Sunday afternoon demanding gender equality, as the world celebrated International Women's Day. 

What’s next for City College of San Francisco?
SF Gate | March 8, 2015
City College of San Francisco has endured — and survived — a near-lethal challenge from the commission that tried to revoke its accreditation and shut down California’s largest public school. 

Hand scorers sought for online Common Core tests
EdSource | March 8, 2015
As millions of students prepare, for the first time, to take a battery of assessments aligned with the Common Core using computers, at least portions of the tests will have to be scored the old-fashioned way: by humans. 

S.F. city attorney argues against archbishop’s morality clauses
SF Gate | March 6, 2015
San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera, seldom one to stand back from a scrap, has blasted his local archbishop’s attempt to insert strict morality clauses into rules governing Catholic high school teachers. 

 

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In the News Archive: February 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS 

UTLA says money is there for teachers; LA Unified not so sure
LA School Report | Feb. 19, 2015
Fueling the impasse announced yesterday between the teachers union, UTLA, and LA Unified is a dispute over so-called “unaccounted” sources of money that the teachers union says could be used for raises and other demands. 

Judgment Day
Slate | Feb. 19, 2015
On Tuesday evening, liberal Catholics in San Francisco announced a vigil to protest new sexual-conduct rules for teachers in the city’s Catholic schools. “We stand with teachers,” they declared, “in rejecting morality clauses that impede their freedom, including the right to choose who to love and marry and how to plan a family.”  

Accreditor still has final say over fate of City College of San Francisco
Chronicle of Higher Education | Feb. 19, 2015
On paper San Francisco’s city attorney won a victory on Tuesday in his lawsuit against the accreditor that oversees City College of San Francisco.  

Judge orders accreditor to redo portion of San Francisco college review
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court injunction released Wednesday would allow -- but not force -- City College of San Francisco to seek a somewhat narrow reconsideration of a private commission's decision to revoke its accreditation.  

City College will defend its accreditation following court injunction
The San Francisco Appeal | Feb. 18, 2015
The chancellor of City College of San Francisco said tonight that the college will take up the opportunity provided by a court injunction to seek reconsideration of a regional commission’s decision to revoke its accreditation.  

Middle ground remains elusive in San Francisco Catholic high school handbook fight
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 17, 2015
The clash over Catholic high school faculty handbooks and teacher contracts in the San Francisco Bay Area seems to be a standoff between those who embrace Catholic teaching as settled and unchanging and those who insist it is evolving and must do so.  

This year, billionaire Eli Broad won’t pay the $1 million prize for inner city school districts
Jewish Business News | Feb. 9, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad, 81, is refusing to pay out a $1 million prize which was promised to the best inner city school systems, arguing the schools are not improving, at least not as fast as they should, the LA Times reported. In fact, Broad is not sure it pays to support any of the traditional school systems.  

Hangovers continue from 1999-2000 pension binge
U-T San Diego | Feb. 9, 2015
Awful decisions involving public employee retirement benefits made during the Legislature’s 1999-2000 session continue to haunt California. The deluge began with the September 1999 enactment of a 50 percent retroactive increase in pensions of most state employees. The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, astonishingly, told lawmakers this giveaway would have little or no long-term cost because the stock market boom would never end. 

Broad Foundation suspends $1-million prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 8, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad has suspended a coveted, $1-million prize to honor the best urban school systems out of concern that they are failing to improve quickly enough. And, associates say, he's no longer certain that he wants to reward traditional school districts at all. 

AFT president Weingarten visits town to give LA teachers a boost
LA School Report | Feb. 5, 2015
As the teachers union’s negotiations with LA Unified drag on, one of the nation’s leading voices for teachers appeared at an event last night hosted by district board member Steve Zimmer and made a strong case for union activity and solidarity.

Broad Foundation suspends public school prize, awards charter school
Breitbart News | Feb. 4, 2015
The Broad Foundation, disappointed with the lack of progress in urban school districts, has suspended its $1 million scholarship prize. The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation said “sluggish academic results from the largest urban school districts in the country” caused the foundation to put the program on hold.

S.F. archbishop’s morality clauses run counter to pope’s message
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 4, 2015
While a forward-thinking pope is changing the image of the Catholic Church by preaching compassion in Google hangouts, his archbishop in San Francisco is going in a different direction, emphasizing sexual limitations in employee morality clauses. 

Broad suspends prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 3, 2015
The locally based Broad Foundation has suspended a widely recognized prize for top-performing urban school systems. 

Landmark court decision puts students' needs first
Reason.com | Feb. 1, 2015
"Being a kid in the California system right now is a lot like the lottery," says Julia Macias, a ninth grader who lives in California's San Fernando Valley. "You might get an amazing teacher one year and then a not so amazing teacher and you see your scores are reflected upon that." 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS 

San Francisco archbishop defends strict teacher morality code
CBS News | Feb. 20, 2015
The archbishop of San Francisco sent a letter to California lawmakers on Thursday asking them to respect his right to hire people who uphold Catholic teachings. 

Common Core lessons aim to close persistent achievement gap
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Michelle Rodriguez, assistant superintendent of the Santa Ana School District, is convinced that the new Common Core State Standards can help narrow California’s achievement gap. For all too many decades, that troubling disparity has been marked by lower test scores and higher dropout rates for African-American, Latino and low-income students, and students who are still learning English. 

S.F. archbishop fires back at lawmaker critics
SF Gate | Feb. 19, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone fired back Thursday at state lawmakers who characterized as intolerant and possibly illegal his effort to have teachers at four Catholic high schools sign a labor contract declaring their opposition to same-sex unions, abortion and contraception. 

California task force urges reform of special education funding
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Federal and state funding rates for special education would be equalized across California and new special education teachers would be authorized to teach general education if draft recommendations from a task force presented on Wednesday are implemented. 

Under San Francisco's new handbook language, could gay marriage lead to dismissal?
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 19, 2015
If a teacher's same-sex marriage becomes public knowledge, will he or she be dismissed as an employee of a Catholic high school owned and operated by the San Francisco archdiocese? 

‘Constitutional crisis’ declared as Los Angeles Unified lawyers defend teacher evaluation system
LA Daily News | Feb. 18, 2015
Los Angeles Unified lawyers argued this week that a “constitutional crisis” should allow them to keep a controversial new teacher evaluation system without the consent of its 35,000-member teachers union. 

Archbishop on crash course with S.F., state
SF Gate | Feb. 18, 2015
San Francisco’s archbishop is trying to make its Catholic schools more Catholic, but city and state officials are poised to push back, saying any effort to discriminate against employees will be met with legal action. 

Hundreds protest morality clause for teachers proposed by SF Archbishop
ABC 7 News | Feb. 18, 2015
There's backlash against San Francisco's Catholic archbishop and his controversial move to make teachers sign morality clauses critical of same-sex marriage and birth control, among other things. 

Head Start programs in California rebound as funding increases
EdSource | Feb. 18, 2015
Two years ago, federally funded early learning providers in California were forced to reduce the available slots for 6,000 incoming students after a gridlocked Congress could not agree on how to reduce the deficit, triggering a round of automatic spending cuts to Head Start and other federal programs across the nation. 

Tuition hike put on hold for UC summer school
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
Students planning to attend UC's upcoming summer school sessions got a much welcome reprieve Wednesday from tuition increases that could have been as large as 5%. 

Lawmakers urge S.F. archbishop to withdraw teacher morality clauses
LA Times | Feb. 17, 2015
Eight state lawmakers on Tuesday urged San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone to withdraw the "morality clauses" he unveiled this month in a handbook for high school teachers, and to reverse his intention to redefine teachers as "ministers" in their employment contracts. 

California could lose millions in funding, report states
EdSource | Feb. 15, 2015
The White House released a report that shows that school districts with large numbers of low-income students, including Los Angeles, Fresno and San Diego, stand to lose millions of dollars in federal funding under the House version of amendments to the nation’s education law. 

California schools utilizing Common Core coaches
Education Dive | Feb. 13, 2015
To ease the transition to Common Core, some California districts are putting instructional coaches in classrooms to help teachers modify their lessons for the new standards. 

S.F. archbishop's imposition of morality clause at schools outrages many
LA Times | Feb. 12, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone sparked a protest last summer when he ignored pleas from public officials to cancel his plans to march in Washington, D.C., against same-sex marriage. 

Lawmakers skeptical of Brown’s facility funding plan
Cabinet Report | Feb. 12, 2015
Lawmakers on Wednesday expressed skepticism of Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to reduce the state's role in building and maintaining schools by pushing the bulk of the financial burden onto local districts and their communities. 

Jerrod Bradley: Common Core math is worth the effort
Fresno Bee | Feb. 12, 2015
California schools are actively working toward the successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards and Smarter Balanced assessments. This is a multiyear effort and represents an important step toward better preparing students for what comes after high school. 

Teachers protest as San Francisco archbishop insists schools uphold Catholic teaching on marriage
Life Site | Feb. 11, 2015
The Catholic archbishop of San Francisco is facing resistance to his efforts to protect the students in diocesan high schools from the secular wave of society, including from some teachers, parents, and students. 

S.F. schools superintendent to receive 27% pay raise
SF Gate | Feb. 11, 2015
San Francisco Unified School District Superintendent Richard Carranza will see an extra $65,000 in his annual paycheck — a 27 percent raise granted unanimously by the school board Tuesday night. 

Educators, builders oppose Brown's plan to stop state borrowing to pay for schools
Ventura County Star | Feb. 11, 2015
Lawmakers, educators and representatives of the homebuilding industry pushed back Wednesday against Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to end a long-standing state policy of issuing bonds to help pay for school construction. 

Charter school enrollment surges
San Jose Mercury News | Feb. 11, 2015
Statewide enrollment in charter schools grew 7 percent this school year, so that more than one in 12 California public school students attends a charter school, according to an advocacy group's report released Wednesday. 

Archbishop Cordileone is a true shepherd of Catholic schools
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 11, 2015
Much ado has been made about Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s efforts to ensure that Catholic schoolteachers model moral behavior. If the mission of Catholic schools is to form students both in knowledge and in faith, then he is simply doing his job to ensure that teachers have the necessary qualifications for religious education. 

Autism advocacy group states vaccination link unfounded
EdSource | Feb. 10, 2015
In the midst of a nationwide measles outbreak tied to unvaccinated children and adults in California, the nation’s leading autism advocacy group has changed its position and now clearly states there is no link between vaccinations and autism. 

Common Core and California’s economic success
Fox and Hounds | Feb. 9, 2015
California is on its way to becoming the world’s seventh-largest economy. Driving this growth is our world leading high technology businesses alongside our longtime strong entertainment, agriculture and energy sectors. Sustaining California’s economic growth will require a skilled workforce to meet the demands of our evolving, expanding economy. Unfortunately, there is a significant skilled workforce shortage in our state. The disconnect between workers and job readiness has challenged employers in Kern County and all of California.

Teacher directive prompts vigil at San Francisco cathedral
SF Gate | Feb. 6, 2015
About 100 people attended a vigil outside the Roman Catholic cathedral in San Francisco on Friday to protest the local archbishop's move to require teachers at four Catholic high schools to lead their public lives inside the classroom and out in accordance with church teachings on homosexuality, birth control and other hot-button issues.

New lawmakers rise instantly to run committees on children’s policies
EdSource | Feb. 5
In a sign of how much term limits are affecting the legislative process in California, freshman legislators have been appointed to chair four out of six key committees handling education and children’s issues – even though they had no prior experience as lawmakers in the state Capitol.

How not to fix No Child Left Behind
EdSource | Feb. 5
Mattilyn Gonzalez is a thriving student, who has earned straight A’s and a spot in an accelerated learning program at her middle school. Her parents, Orlando and Celine Gonzalez, trace that success back to a strong preschool program – so they were determined that their second daughter, Arianna, would get the same opportunities.

The college loan bombshell hidden in the budget
Politico | Feb. 5, 2015
In obscure data tables buried deep in its 2016 budget proposal, the Obama administration revealed this week that its student loan program had a $21.8 billion shortfall last year, apparently the largest ever recorded for any government credit program.

California lawmakers aim to limit vaccine exemptions
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
California lawmakers proposed legislation Wednesday that would require parents to vaccinate all school children unless a child's health is in danger, joining only two other states with such stringent restrictions.

Analysis: In California, charter school students most likely to be unvaccinated
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
Charter and private school students in California are much more likely to have vaccine exemptions than students enrolled in a regular district schools, according to an analysis by a researcher at the University of Maryland in College Park.

SF archdiocese requiring educators to publicly align with Catholic teaching
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 5, 2015
The Archdiocese of San Francisco is strengthening language in its faculty contract and handbook that requires high school educators to uphold Catholic teachings in their professional and public lives.

Disney measles outbreak: State lawmakers propose ditching 'personal' vaccine exemption
KPCC | Feb. 4, 2015
With California dealing with the measles outbreak that began at the Anaheim Disney theme parks, three state lawmakers Wednesday proposed ditching the law that allows parents to not vaccinate their children based on "personal belief."

What will bachelor's degrees from community colleges be worth?
LA Times | Feb. 4, 2015
When 15 California community colleges received preliminary approval to offer four-year degrees recently, officials touted the move as a way to provide highly trained workers at a lower cost, especially for technical jobs in fields such as medicine and dentistry.

Classroom coaches critical as teachers shift to Common Core
EdSource | Feb. 4, 2015
To break down the isolation that many teachers experience in their classrooms, California schools are using instructional coaches as a key tool to help teachers adapt their instruction to implement the Common Core standards in math and English language arts.

Spotlight on Jeb Bush's K-12 group as new chief takes over
Education Week | Feb. 3, 2015
Jeb Bush's decision to turn over leadership of the prominent K-12 organization he founded to Condoleezza Rice as he mulls a White House bid could signal a new phase for the Foundation for Excellence in Education—and for a broader network of advocacy groups seeking to challenge what they view as the status quo in education.

National magazine, Reason, has a look at the Vergara case
LA School Report | Feb. 3, 2015
With the eyes of the educational world closely watching the Vergara v. California case as it awaits an appeal ruling, the libertarian-tilted publication Reason magazine is the latest national media organization to profile the issue.

API should be replaced, state committee recommends
EdSource | Feb. 3, 2015
A state advisory committee that spent more than two years trying to find a way to rejigger the Academic Performance Index is now recommending moving away from that single number in favor of a more comprehensive system allowing for a broader picture of school effectiveness.

Common Core enters arena of presidential politics
EdSource | Feb. 2, 2015
With the growing certainty that Jeb Bush will be a candidate in the 2016 presidential campaign, his support for the Common Core State Standards guarantees that the standards being implemented in 43 states will be drawn into the whirlpool of presidential politics.

Easier path from community college to Cal State, report says
LA Times | Feb. 2, 2015
The number of community college students who earned degrees that streamline entry into Cal State grew significantly last year, but too many students still are unaware of the transfer program, according to a report released Monday.

CCSF special trustee retires unexpectedly
SF Gate | Feb. 1, 2015
The state-appointed “special trustee with extraordinary powers” who replaced the elected Board of Trustees at City College of San Francisco in 2013 is abruptly retiring as the huge school appears to have escaped a closure threat, for now.

CCSF special trustee to retire; replacement to be named by end of month
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 1, 2015
Robert Agrella, the special trustee tasked in 2013 with saving City College of San Francisco from losing its accreditation, will retire just weeks after the embattled school was given two more years to meet accrediting requirements.

Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: April 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS

Influential Catholics call for removal of San Francisco archbishop in full-page ad
National Catholic Reporter | April 16, 2015
A powerful cross-section of Catholics in the San Francisco archdiocese is asking Pope Francis to replace Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone, saying the archbishop has “fostered an atmosphere of division and intolerance.”

Marten’s stand on school testing isn’t constructive
U-T San Diego | April 16, 2015
San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten has built up plenty of good will in her two years on the job. She’s very smart, has a vision for what she wants to accomplish and seems unfazed by the political pressures she faces running a big-city school district.

StudentsFirst sues teachers unions over dues
Capital & Main | April 15, 2015
The latest legal assault on the right of the state’s public-sector unions to collect dues was filed in Los Angeles earlier this month by StudentsFirst, the Sacramento-based, national school-privatization organization. 

Politicizing investments hurts pensioners, taxpayers
OC Register | April 15, 2015
Politicians love to spend other people’s money. This axiom is no less true when it comes to investing other people’s money. California’s pension funds have a long history of political activism – to the detriment of the employees and retirees whose benefits are paid, in large part, from pension investment returns, and the taxpayers who are forced to pick up the slack when the politically motivated investments underperform. 

CalSTRS board trustees elected to serve another four-year term
PRWeb | April 14, 2015
The California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) yesterday announced the election of the three member-representatives to the CalSTRS governing board. The members will each serve a four-year term, which begins January 1, 2016. 

Unions critical of poll on teachers tenure and seniority-based layoffs
LA Times | April 13, 2015
Teachers unions expressed concern Monday over the results of a poll indicating that California voters are critical of current job protections provided to instructors in public schools.

New poll challenges union stance on tenure
Education Week | April 13, 2015
California's teacher unions got yet another wake-up call over the weekend with the release of the USC/Dornsife poll by the Los Angeles Times. 

Even with charter support, LA teachers union faces uphill battle
Watchdog Arena | April 10, 2015
As California teachers unions develop strategies to reverse the trend in lagging membership, ongoing struggles bring the spotlight back to the school choice debate. With membership declining, charter organizations become stronger. To the union leadership, the competition means less support for its political activities. 

Teachers balk at paying for politics
OC Register | April 9, 2015
Bhavini Bhakta spent 10 years as an elementary school teacher, for the Monrovia Unified School District and the Arcadia Unified School District. She was laid off five times in the space of nine years, including, ironically, the year in which she won her school’s “teacher of the year” award. 

CalPERS staff: Don’t sell coal stocks
Sacramento Bee | April 8, 2015
CalPERS’ investment staff said Wednesday the big pension fund should hold onto its coal investments, despite proposed legislation by the leader of the state Senate that would pressure CalPERS and CalSTRS to unload their holdings.

Teachers sue to join union without paying for political activities
LA Times | April 8, 2015
An advocacy group has filed a lawsuit seeking to stop teachers unions in California from using member dues for political purposes unless individual instructors provide their permission.

California teachers unions face new legal challenge over dues
Washington Post | April 7, 2015
Four California teachers are suing their unions over the use of member dues for political activities, opening a new legal front against unions that are already facing a separate challenge to their ability to collect dues from all teachers. 

Another lawsuit challenges teachers unions’ dues
EdSource | April 6, 2015
A second group of California teachers has filed a lawsuit that’s a cousin to Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which is challenging the right of public employees’ unions to collect mandatory dues. 

California teacher unions face new front with dues battle
Bloomberg News | April 3, 2015
California teacher unions face a new challenge from the same corporate law powerhouse that last year won a first-of-its-kind challenge to tenure rules that secure teacher's jobs. 

CA teachers protest millions of dollars in gun investments
Breitbart News | April 3, 2015
On April 2, a group of California teachers protested the fact that the California State Teachers Retirement System (CalSTRS) is still invested in guns–particularly Bushmaster Firearms–more than two years after Adam Lanza’s heinous attack on Sandy Hook Elementary. 

CalSTRS won’t rush to sell firearms investment
Sacramento Bee | April 2, 2015
CalSTRS, facing protests from schoolteachers, ruled out a quick sale Thursday of its investment in the manufacturer of the rifle used to massacre 26 students and teachers at a Connecticut elementary school in 2012. 

California teachers demand a gun-free retirement
KCRA | April 2, 2015
The teachers held a protest Thursday at the California State Teachers Retirement System headquarters in West Sacramento. 

Teachers union presses CalSTRS to unload gun investment
Sacramento Bee | April 2, 2015
A group of California schoolteachers Thursday stepped up the pressure on CalSTRS to unload its investment in the company that made the rifle used to massacre 26 people at a Connecticut elementary school. 

CalSTRS: Teachers’ retirement board re-elects chair and vice chair
PR Web | April 2, 2015
The trustees of the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) yesterday returned Harry Keiley as board chair and Sharon Hendricks as vice chair for the 2015-16 term. 

California teachers stage coordinated protests against gun investments (VIDEO)
Guns.com | April 2, 2015
A California teachers’ union staged protests in Sacramento and Los Angeles on Thursday to voice concerns over its retirement money being invested in a company that manufactures the rifle type used in the Sandy Hook school massacre. 

AM Alert: California teachers press pension fund to divest from gunmaker
Sacramento Bee | April 1, 2015
Amid a legislative push this year for California’s public pension systems to divest from coal, a new controversy is brewing over the California State Teachers’ Retirement System’s investment in a gunmaker tied to the Newtown school shooting.

Sandy Hook families support California teachers' union
CT Post | April 1, 2015
The families of seven victims of the Sandy Hook massacre have written a letter to the California Federation of Teachers supporting its effort to divest its pension fund of a company that makes guns.

Teachers demand CalSTRS unload firearms investments
Sacramento Bee | April 1, 2015
When a gunman slaughtered 26 children and adults at a Connecticut elementary school, California’s teacher pension fund responded with a forceful denunciation of gun violence and said it was rethinking its investment in the company that manufactured the firearm used in the shooting. 

State brings down the book on charters
OC Register | March 30, 2015
According to the adage, “If you can’t beat them, join them.” But not in Sacramento. When it comes to dealing with California’s successful, independent charter schools, powerful, monied special interests – and the lawmakers they fund – prefer a twist on the adage: If you can’t beat them, destroy them. This was manifested last week when four Democratic lawmakers trumpeted their introduction of a packet of new bills increasing state regulations over charters, including heightened public reporting requirements, restricting for-profit operations, greater transparency and promotion of employee rights.

L.A. Teachers Escalate
Labor Notes | March 30, 2015
Fifteen thousand teachers, counselors, and other members of United Teachers Los Angeles filled downtown’s Grand Park on February 26 to demand a fair contract for themselves and their students.

Mark James Miller: California Federation of Teachers convention another sign of unions’ revival
Noozhawk | March 27, 2015
More than 600 delegates, staff and guests. Fifty-four different union locals represented, from one end of California to the other.

Beyond Vergara
City Journal | March 27, 2015
Last year, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Rolf Treu ruled that California’s archaic seniority, tenure, and dismissal statutes were unconstitutional, adding that the evidence submitted by the plaintiffs “shocks the conscience.” The state and two teachers unions, the California Teachers Association and the California Federation of Teachers, are appealing Treu’s decision in Vergara v. California. Should the judgment survive the appeals process, legislators would need to pass new laws to fill the void. But Republican lawmakers aren’t waiting for a decision, which won’t come down for months—or possibly years.

UTLA says money is there for teachers; LA Unified not so sure
LA School Report | Feb. 19, 2015
Fueling the impasse announced yesterday between the teachers union, UTLA, and LA Unified is a dispute over so-called “unaccounted” sources of money that the teachers union says could be used for raises and other demands. 

Judgment Day
Slate | Feb. 19, 2015
On Tuesday evening, liberal Catholics in San Francisco announced a vigil to protest new sexual-conduct rules for teachers in the city’s Catholic schools. “We stand with teachers,” they declared, “in rejecting morality clauses that impede their freedom, including the right to choose who to love and marry and how to plan a family.” 

Accreditor still has final say over fate of City College of San Francisco
Chronicle of Higher Education | Feb. 19, 2015
On paper San Francisco’s city attorney won a victory on Tuesday in his lawsuit against the accreditor that oversees City College of San Francisco. 

Judge orders accreditor to redo portion of San Francisco college review
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court injunction released Wednesday would allow -- but not force -- City College of San Francisco to seek a somewhat narrow reconsideration of a private commission's decision to revoke its accreditation. 

City College will defend its accreditation following court injunction
The San Francisco Appeal | Feb. 18, 2015
The chancellor of City College of San Francisco said tonight that the college will take up the opportunity provided by a court injunction to seek reconsideration of a regional commission’s decision to revoke its accreditation. 

Middle ground remains elusive in San Francisco Catholic high school handbook fight
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 17, 2015
The clash over Catholic high school faculty handbooks and teacher contracts in the San Francisco Bay Area seems to be a standoff between those who embrace Catholic teaching as settled and unchanging and those who insist it is evolving and must do so. 

This year, billionaire Eli Broad won’t pay the $1 million prize for inner city school districts
Jewish Business News | Feb. 9, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad, 81, is refusing to pay out a $1 million prize which was promised to the best inner city school systems, arguing the schools are not improving, at least not as fast as they should, the LA Times reported. In fact, Broad is not sure it pays to support any of the traditional school systems. 

Hangovers continue from 1999-2000 pension binge
U-T San Diego | Feb. 9, 2015
Awful decisions involving public employee retirement benefits made during the Legislature’s 1999-2000 session continue to haunt California. The deluge began with the September 1999 enactment of a 50 percent retroactive increase in pensions of most state employees. The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, astonishingly, told lawmakers this giveaway would have little or no long-term cost because the stock market boom would never end. 

Broad Foundation suspends $1-million prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 8, 2015
Billionaire Eli Broad has suspended a coveted, $1-million prize to honor the best urban school systems out of concern that they are failing to improve quickly enough. And, associates say, he's no longer certain that he wants to reward traditional school districts at all.

AFT president Weingarten visits town to give LA teachers a boost
LA School Report | Feb. 5, 2015
As the teachers union’s negotiations with LA Unified drag on, one of the nation’s leading voices for teachers appeared at an event last night hosted by district board member Steve Zimmer and made a strong case for union activity and solidarity.

Broad Foundation suspends public school prize, awards charter school
Breitbart News | Feb. 4, 2015
The Broad Foundation, disappointed with the lack of progress in urban school districts, has suspended its $1 million scholarship prize. The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation said “sluggish academic results from the largest urban school districts in the country” caused the foundation to put the program on hold.

S.F. archbishop’s morality clauses run counter to pope’s message
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 4, 2015
While a forward-thinking pope is changing the image of the Catholic Church by preaching compassion in Google hangouts, his archbishop in San Francisco is going in a different direction, emphasizing sexual limitations in employee morality clauses. 

Broad suspends prize for urban school districts
LA Times | Feb. 3, 2015
The locally based Broad Foundation has suspended a widely recognized prize for top-performing urban school systems. 

Landmark court decision puts students' needs first
Reason.com | Feb. 1, 2015
"Being a kid in the California system right now is a lot like the lottery," says Julia Macias, a ninth grader who lives in California's San Fernando Valley. "You might get an amazing teacher one year and then a not so amazing teacher and you see your scores are reflected upon that." 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS

San Francisco archbishop defends strict teacher morality code
CBS News | Feb. 20, 2015
The archbishop of San Francisco sent a letter to California lawmakers on Thursday asking them to respect his right to hire people who uphold Catholic teachings.

Common Core lessons aim to close persistent achievement gap
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Michelle Rodriguez, assistant superintendent of the Santa Ana School District, is convinced that the new Common Core State Standards can help narrow California’s achievement gap. For all too many decades, that troubling disparity has been marked by lower test scores and higher dropout rates for African-American, Latino and low-income students, and students who are still learning English.

S.F. archbishop fires back at lawmaker critics
SF Gate | Feb. 19, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone fired back Thursday at state lawmakers who characterized as intolerant and possibly illegal his effort to have teachers at four Catholic high schools sign a labor contract declaring their opposition to same-sex unions, abortion and contraception.

California task force urges reform of special education funding
EdSource | Feb. 19, 2015
Federal and state funding rates for special education would be equalized across California and new special education teachers would be authorized to teach general education if draft recommendations from a task force presented on Wednesday are implemented.

Under San Francisco's new handbook language, could gay marriage lead to dismissal?
National Catholic Reporter | Feb. 19, 2015
If a teacher's same-sex marriage becomes public knowledge, will he or she be dismissed as an employee of a Catholic high school owned and operated by the San Francisco archdiocese?

‘Constitutional crisis’ declared as Los Angeles Unified lawyers defend teacher evaluation system
LA Daily News | Feb. 18, 2015
Los Angeles Unified lawyers argued this week that a “constitutional crisis” should allow them to keep a controversial new teacher evaluation system without the consent of its 35,000-member teachers union.

Archbishop on crash course with S.F., state
SF Gate | Feb. 18, 2015
San Francisco’s archbishop is trying to make its Catholic schools more Catholic, but city and state officials are poised to push back, saying any effort to discriminate against employees will be met with legal action.

Hundreds protest morality clause for teachers proposed by SF Archbishop
ABC 7 News | Feb. 18, 2015
There's backlash against San Francisco's Catholic archbishop and his controversial move to make teachers sign morality clauses critical of same-sex marriage and birth control, among other things.

Head Start programs in California rebound as funding increases
EdSource | Feb. 18, 2015
Two years ago, federally funded early learning providers in California were forced to reduce the available slots for 6,000 incoming students after a gridlocked Congress could not agree on how to reduce the deficit, triggering a round of automatic spending cuts to Head Start and other federal programs across the nation.

Tuition hike put on hold for UC summer school
LA Times | Feb. 18, 2015
Students planning to attend UC's upcoming summer school sessions got a much welcome reprieve Wednesday from tuition increases that could have been as large as 5%.

Lawmakers urge S.F. archbishop to withdraw teacher morality clauses
LA Times | Feb. 17, 2015
Eight state lawmakers on Tuesday urged San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone to withdraw the "morality clauses" he unveiled this month in a handbook for high school teachers, and to reverse his intention to redefine teachers as "ministers" in their employment contracts.

California could lose millions in funding, report states
EdSource | Feb. 15, 2015
The White House released a report that shows that school districts with large numbers of low-income students, including Los Angeles, Fresno and San Diego, stand to lose millions of dollars in federal funding under the House version of amendments to the nation’s education law.

California schools utilizing Common Core coaches
Education Dive | Feb. 13, 2015
To ease the transition to Common Core, some California districts are putting instructional coaches in classrooms to help teachers modify their lessons for the new standards.

S.F. archbishop's imposition of morality clause at schools outrages many
LA Times | Feb. 12, 2015
San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone sparked a protest last summer when he ignored pleas from public officials to cancel his plans to march in Washington, D.C., against same-sex marriage.

Lawmakers skeptical of Brown’s facility funding plan
Cabinet Report | Feb. 12, 2015
Lawmakers on Wednesday expressed skepticism of Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to reduce the state's role in building and maintaining schools by pushing the bulk of the financial burden onto local districts and their communities.

Jerrod Bradley: Common Core math is worth the effort
Fresno Bee | Feb. 12, 2015
California schools are actively working toward the successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards and Smarter Balanced assessments. This is a multiyear effort and represents an important step toward better preparing students for what comes after high school.

Teachers protest as San Francisco archbishop insists schools uphold Catholic teaching on marriage
Life Site | Feb. 11, 2015
The Catholic archbishop of San Francisco is facing resistance to his efforts to protect the students in diocesan high schools from the secular wave of society, including from some teachers, parents, and students.

S.F. schools superintendent to receive 27% pay raise
SF Gate | Feb. 11, 2015
San Francisco Unified School District Superintendent Richard Carranza will see an extra $65,000 in his annual paycheck — a 27 percent raise granted unanimously by the school board Tuesday night.

Educators, builders oppose Brown's plan to stop state borrowing to pay for schools
Ventura County Star | Feb. 11, 2015
Lawmakers, educators and representatives of the homebuilding industry pushed back Wednesday against Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to end a long-standing state policy of issuing bonds to help pay for school construction.

Charter school enrollment surges
San Jose Mercury News | Feb. 11, 2015
Statewide enrollment in charter schools grew 7 percent this school year, so that more than one in 12 California public school students attends a charter school, according to an advocacy group's report released Wednesday.

Archbishop Cordileone is a true shepherd of Catholic schools
San Francisco Chronicle | Feb. 11, 2015
Much ado has been made about Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s efforts to ensure that Catholic schoolteachers model moral behavior. If the mission of Catholic schools is to form students both in knowledge and in faith, then he is simply doing his job to ensure that teachers have the necessary qualifications for religious education.

Autism advocacy group states vaccination link unfounded
EdSource | Feb. 10, 2015
In the midst of a nationwide measles outbreak tied to unvaccinated children and adults in California, the nation’s leading autism advocacy group has changed its position and now clearly states there is no link between vaccinations and autism.

Common Core and California’s economic success
Fox and Hounds | Feb. 9, 2015
California is on its way to becoming the world’s seventh-largest economy. Driving this growth is our world leading high technology businesses alongside our longtime strong entertainment, agriculture and energy sectors. Sustaining California’s economic growth will require a skilled workforce to meet the demands of our evolving, expanding economy. Unfortunately, there is a significant skilled workforce shortage in our state. The disconnect between workers and job readiness has challenged employers in Kern County and all of California.

Teacher directive prompts vigil at San Francisco cathedral
SF Gate | Feb. 6, 2015
About 100 people attended a vigil outside the Roman Catholic cathedral in San Francisco on Friday to protest the local archbishop's move to require teachers at four Catholic high schools to lead their public lives inside the classroom and out in accordance with church teachings on homosexuality, birth control and other hot-button issues.


New lawmakers rise instantly to run committees on children’s policies

EdSource | Feb. 5
In a sign of how much term limits are affecting the legislative process in California, freshman legislators have been appointed to chair four out of six key committees handling education and children’s issues – even though they had no prior experience as lawmakers in the state Capitol.

How not to fix No Child Left Behind
EdSource | Feb. 5
Mattilyn Gonzalez is a thriving student, who has earned straight A’s and a spot in an accelerated learning program at her middle school. Her parents, Orlando and Celine Gonzalez, trace that success back to a strong preschool program – so they were determined that their second daughter, Arianna, would get the same opportunities.

The college loan bombshell hidden in the budget
Politico | Feb. 5, 2015
In obscure data tables buried deep in its 2016 budget proposal, the Obama administration revealed this week that its student loan program had a $21.8 billion shortfall last year, apparently the largest ever recorded for any government credit program.

California lawmakers aim to limit vaccine exemptions
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
California lawmakers proposed legislation Wednesday that would require parents to vaccinate all school children unless a child's health is in danger, joining only two other states with such stringent restrictions.

Analysis: In California, charter school students most likely to be unvaccinated
Education Week | Feb. 5, 2015
Charter and private school students in California are much more likely to have vaccine exemptions than students enrolled in a regular district schools, according to an analysis by a researcher at the University of Maryland in College Park.

SF archdiocese requiring educators to publicly align with Catholic teaching
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 5, 2015
The Archdiocese of San Francisco is strengthening language in its faculty contract and handbook that requires high school educators to uphold Catholic teachings in their professional and public lives.

Disney measles outbreak: State lawmakers propose ditching 'personal' vaccine exemption
KPCC | Feb. 4, 2015
With California dealing with the measles outbreak that began at the Anaheim Disney theme parks, three state lawmakers Wednesday proposed ditching the law that allows parents to not vaccinate their children based on "personal belief."

What will bachelor's degrees from community colleges be worth?
LA Times | Feb. 4, 2015
When 15 California community colleges received preliminary approval to offer four-year degrees recently, officials touted the move as a way to provide highly trained workers at a lower cost, especially for technical jobs in fields such as medicine and dentistry.

Classroom coaches critical as teachers shift to Common Core
EdSource | Feb. 4, 2015
To break down the isolation that many teachers experience in their classrooms, California schools are using instructional coaches as a key tool to help teachers adapt their instruction to implement the Common Core standards in math and English language arts.

Spotlight on Jeb Bush's K-12 group as new chief takes over
Education Week | Feb. 3, 2015
Jeb Bush's decision to turn over leadership of the prominent K-12 organization he founded to Condoleezza Rice as he mulls a White House bid could signal a new phase for the Foundation for Excellence in Education—and for a broader network of advocacy groups seeking to challenge what they view as the status quo in education.

National magazine, Reason, has a look at the Vergara case
LA School Report | Feb. 3, 2015
With the eyes of the educational world closely watching the Vergara v. California case as it awaits an appeal ruling, the libertarian-tilted publication Reason magazine is the latest national media organization to profile the issue.

API should be replaced, state committee recommends
EdSource | Feb. 3, 2015
A state advisory committee that spent more than two years trying to find a way to rejigger the Academic Performance Index is now recommending moving away from that single number in favor of a more comprehensive system allowing for a broader picture of school effectiveness.

Common Core enters arena of presidential politics
EdSource | Feb. 2, 2015
With the growing certainty that Jeb Bush will be a candidate in the 2016 presidential campaign, his support for the Common Core State Standards guarantees that the standards being implemented in 43 states will be drawn into the whirlpool of presidential politics.

Easier path from community college to Cal State, report says
LA Times | Feb. 2, 2015
The number of community college students who earned degrees that streamline entry into Cal State grew significantly last year, but too many students still are unaware of the transfer program, according to a report released Monday.

CCSF special trustee retires unexpectedly
SF Gate | Feb. 1, 2015
The state-appointed “special trustee with extraordinary powers” who replaced the elected Board of Trustees at City College of San Francisco in 2013 is abruptly retiring as the huge school appears to have escaped a closure threat, for now.

CCSF special trustee to retire; replacement to be named by end of month
San Francisco Examiner | Feb. 1, 2015
Robert Agrella, the special trustee tasked in 2013 with saving City College of San Francisco from losing its accreditation, will retire just weeks after the embattled school was given two more years to meet accrediting requirements.


Media articles are ARCHIVED monthly. For assistance, Fred Glass at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the News Archive: January 2015

CFT IN THE NEWS

Community college board ends agency’s exclusive right to accredit state’s community colleges
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 23, 2015
The California Community College Board of Governors decided this week to open up competition for the accreditation of community colleges in California by removing language from their regulations that gave the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges a monopoly. 

CA Community College Board of Governors ends agency’s exclusive right to accredit state’s community colleges
San Francisco Appeal | Jan. 22, 2015
The California Community College Board of Governors decided this week to open up competition for the accreditation of community colleges in California by removing language from their regulations that gave the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges a monopoly. 

Community college in the crosshairs
In These Times | Jan. 21, 2015
On December 9, 2014, dozens of students and faculty from the City College of San Francisco (CCSF) packed into a courtroom to witness the conclusion of an unusual trial.

A second chance for a community college
Public News Service | Jan. 19, 2015
One of the state's largest community colleges is getting a second chance to stay open.

Accreditor fumbled in acting against City College of San Francisco, court says
The Chronicle of Higher Education | Jan. 16, 2015
A state judge in California has concluded that a regional accreditor denied due process to City College of San Francisco, and has ruled that the two-year college must be given a new opportunity to argue against being closed. 

California lawmakers seek to restore social services funds
People’s World | Jan. 14, 2015
With California's corporate and income tax revenues rising, many Democratic state legislators are eager to restore the massive funding cuts suffered by human services programs in recent years.

Union calls City College decision ‘ticking time bomb’
SFBay.ca News | Jan. 14, 2015
Unions and officials expressed concern Wednesday that City College of San Francisco’s future remains threatened despite an announcement by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges allowing the college two more years to fight for its accreditation.

City College of San Francisco gets 2-year reprieve from accreditor
Wall Street Journal | Jan. 14, 2015
City College of San Francisco, one of the nation’s largest community colleges that had been threatened with loss of accreditation, will get another two years to right itself.

Unions voice concern over City College’s future after restoration status granted by accrediting commission
San Francisco Appeal | Jan. 14, 2015
Unions and officials expressed concern today that City College of San Francisco’s future remains threatened despite an announcement by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges allowing the college two more years to fight for its accreditation.

California schools fail students, teachers with nurse shortage
San Jose Inside | Jan. 12, 2015
Serious health issues can play out in schools every day, sometimes in life and death ways. Yet few schools have a credentialed school nurse at the ready to appropriately address the problem.

Survey: Teachers support changes in state job protection laws
LA School Report | Jan. 12, 2015
The majority of public school teachers who participated in a new survey support changes in state teacher job protection laws that were the focus of last year’s landmark ruling in Vergara v. California.

Brown unveils largest-ever California budget proposal
Wall Street Journal | Jan. 9, 2015
Even as he proposed a record $113.3 billion state budget plan Friday, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown faced potential political fights with members of his own party over tax increases, state worker benefits, education spending and programs for the poor.

School windfall: Brown proposes $7.8 billion more for education
San Jose Mercury News | Jan. 9, 2015
California public schools and community colleges will reap the lion's share of revenues from a booming economy, with their budgets growing by $7.8 billion, Gov. Jerry Brown outlined on Friday.

Brown’s budget: More for Common Core, Internet, charters, special ed
LA School Report | Jan. 9, 2015
Gov. Jerry Brown‘s proposed state budget for 2015-2016, released today, includes $52 million more in K-12 funding than last year’s budget.

Gov. Brown's California budget calls for record $113 billion in spending
San Jose Mercury News | Jan. 9, 2015
The $113 billion state budget plan that Gov. Jerry Brown rolled out Friday sets up two potentially fierce political confrontations.

Brown Unveils Largest-Ever California Budget Proposal
Down Jones Business News | Jan. 9, 2015
Even as he proposed a record $113.3 billion state budget plan Friday, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown faced potential political fights with members of his own party over tax increases, state worker benefits, education spending and programs for the poor. 

California Gov. Jerry Brown set to present budget
Wall Street Journal | Jan. 9, 2015
California Gov. Jerry Brown will face his first political test of the year when he releases his initial 2015-16 budget proposal Friday--a test that will likely come from members of his own Democratic Party. 

Big CCSF decisions loom: college’s future at stake
SF Gate | Jan. 9, 2015
January is a crucial month for City College of San Francisco. The commission trying to revoke its accreditation voted privately this week on whether to grant the college two more years to comply with standards, and could announce its decision at the end of its three-day meeting Friday in Sacramento — or delay the announcement for days or weeks.

For City College of San Francisco, new year a matter of survival
Diverse | Jan. 1, 2015
In the last two years, City College of San Francisco, one of the nation’s largest community colleges, has seen its student enrollment shrink by more than 20 percent, from more than 100,000 students to fewer than 80,000, according to college officials. 

Several education-related bills to take effect this year
Contra Costa Times | Jan. 1, 2015
As educators and administrators return to schools this month, many will help implement new laws taking effect that will require increased teacher training and fewer suspensions and expulsions, among other changes. 

New complaints filed against CCSF accreditor
San Francisco Examiner | Dec. 23, 2014
A coalition working to preserve City College of San Francisco's accreditation announced two new complaints Monday against the commission with authority to revoke that accreditation, coalition members said.

 

EDUCATION IN THE NEWS 

House education panel head endorses annual student testing
Education Week | Jan. 23, 2015
The chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee on Thursday endorsed continuing the federally required annual testing of students under the No Child Left Behind education law.

Legislative leaders want to debate school bond
Cabinet Report | Jan. 22, 2015
Despite the state’s long-standing partnership with schools to help pay new construction and remodeling costs, Gov. Jerry Brown has made it clear he doesn’t like the idea of issuing another statewide facilities bond anytime soon.

LAO backs repealing cap on districts’ reserves
EdSource | Jan. 22, 2015
The California School Boards Association’s campaign to persuade the Legislature to reverse a cap on school district reserves got a boost this week when the Legislative Analyst’s Office issued a report issued endorsing a repeal.

Brown, districts at odds over school construction bonds
EdSource | Jan. 21, 2015
Determined to shed long-term state debt, Gov. Jerry Brown wants the state to cease issuing K-12 school construction bonds, leaving school districts to pay the tab for building and renovating schools. A coalition of school districts and the building industry has responded with plans to go straight to voters with a $9 billion state school building bond in 2016.

Calif. watchdog agency recommends repeal of new school budget caps
Reuters | Jan. 21, 2015
California's watchdog agency recommended on Wednesday that the legislature repeal a new law that caps the size of school district budgets, warning that over 91 percent of the state's districts would have violated the new rules if they had been in place in 2014.

California community colleges set record for degrees, certificates
LA Times | Jan. 21, 2015
The number of students who received a degree or certificate from a California community college hit a record high last year and more of them completed remedial math and English courses, officials announced this week.

California’s community colleges need more state attention
SF Gate | Jan. 21, 2015
Education officials have selected 15 California community colleges to offer bachelor’s degrees, in a closely watched pilot program that could have big impacts on higher education throughout the state.

You're Invited! The Impact of Vergara v. California on the Future of Education
Reason.com | Jan. 21, 2015
Last year, a landmark education case took aim at laws protecting bad teachers—and the students won. Vergara v. California reaffirmed the fundamental right of every student to learn from effective teachers and have an equal opportunity to succeed in school, paving the way for teacher accountability and greater choice. 

U.S. education committee calls for strengthening Head Start
EdSource | Jan. 21, 2015
The U.S. House of Representatives education committee released a white paper Wednesday that calls for strengthening the federal Head Start preschool program by coordinating existing early learning programs, improving quality and enhancing parental involvement.

California community colleges board approves 15 pilot bachelor’s degrees
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 20, 2015
Bachelor’s degrees in mortuary work, ranch management and consumer technology design will soon be coming to California community colleges.

Funding 2 years of college is a small price to pay to get educated workers
LA Times | Jan. 19, 2015
President Obama's bold proposal to make two years of community college virtually free is the most encouraging idea for higher education to emerge from Washington in years. Just like the 1862 Morrill Act, which donated land on which to establish great public universities, and the GI Bill, which helped World War II veterans attend college, the president's plan is a game changer, potentially adding two years of college onto every young person's education.

Judge rules in favor of City College of San Francisco
Diverse Education | Jan. 18, 2015
An accrediting commission must give City College of San Francisco — one of California’s largest community colleges — a chance to respond to criticism before deciding whether to stick to its decision to revoke the school’s accreditation, a judge said Friday.

Op-Ed: City College San Francisco gets another chance at accreditation
Digital Journal | Jan. 18, 2015
Judge Curtis E.A. Karnow of the Superior Court of California for San Francisco proposed an injunction on January 16, which requires the accrediting board to reconsider its termination of City College's accreditation status forcing it to close.

The real test of Common Core is about to begin
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 17, 2015
This spring, for the first time since its embrace of a new national road map for public school instruction, California’s students will take their first real Common Core tests.

All eyes on City College’s future
SFBAY.ca News | Jan. 16, 2015
All eyes are on City College of San Francisco as the future of the community college remains up in the air.

Judge says accrediting panel denied San Francisco college a fair review
LA Times | Jan. 16, 2015
In revoking the accreditation of City College of San Francisco, a private commission violated the law in ways that denied the 80,000-student school a fair hearing, a judge tentatively ruled Friday.

Judge gives City College a second chance
SF Weekly | Jan. 16, 2015
City College can finally breath again after a San Francisco Superior Court judge's tentative decision Friday gave the beleaguered college a second chance to keep its doors open to students.

Judge rules on suit over California college's accreditation
ABC 7 | Jan. 16, 2015
A judge says an accrediting commission must give City College of San Francisco a chance to respond to criticism before deciding whether to stick to its decision to revoke the school's accreditation.

SF City College given a chance to respond to criticisms
SF Gate | Jan. 16, 2015
City College of San Francisco will have another chance to challenge the critical findings of an accrediting commission that could close the doors to the school’s nearly 80,000 students, a judge ruled Friday.

Judge: City College did not receive ‘fair’ accreditation hearing
KQED | Jan. 16, 2015
A Superior Court judge has handed City College of San Francisco a temporary legal win in its fight to maintain accreditation.

Judge issues favorable ruling in CCSF’s quest to retain accreditation
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 16, 2015
City College can celebrate another win this week after a tentative decision was handed down Friday by Superior Court Judge Curtis Karnow in the trial that many see as the key to keeping the school's accreditation.

Judge tentatively rolls back City College deaccreditation
SF Bay.ca News | Jan. 16, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court judge announced a tentative ruling Friday that would roll back a regional accrediting commission’s 2013 decision to remove the accreditation of City College of San Francisco. 

Accreditor fumbled in acting against City College of San Francisco, state court says
The Chronicle of Higher Education | Jan. 16, 2015
A state judge in California has concluded that a regional accreditor denied due process to City College of San Francisco, and says the two-year college must be given a new opportunity to argue against being closed. 

SF City College hangs by a thread
Courthouse News Service | Jan. 16, 2015
The City College of San Francisco will keep its accreditation until a commission explains in writing all of its reasons for decertifying the school, a Superior Court judge ruled Friday. 

Tentative ruling could provide relief for embattled City College of San Francisco
KRON | Jan. 16, 2015
City College of San Francisco must get the chance to respond to criticism before it can lose its accreditation, a judge has ruled. 

Judge rules on suit over California college's accreditation
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 16, 2015
An accrediting commission must give City College of San Francisco — one of California's largest community colleges — a chance to respond to criticism before deciding whether to stick to its decision to revoke the school's accreditation, a judge said Friday. 

Judge tentatively reverses decision to revoke CCSF accreditation
NBC Bay Area | Jan. 16, 2015
A San Francisco Superior Court judge announced a tentative ruling Friday that would roll back a regional accrediting commission's 2013 decision to remove the accreditation of City College of San Francisco. 

California community college deserves hearing on accreditation: judge
Reuters | Jan. 16, 2015
A college regulator violated the law by failing to give California's largest community college a fair hearing before deciding to terminate its accreditation, according to a tentative court ruling on Friday. 

New York's tenure laws go to court
Huffington Post | Jan. 16, 2015
Earlier this week, oral arguments opened in Wright v. New York, a lawsuit challenging New York statutes that make it nearly impossible to replace teachers who are not up to the job. This first motion will determine whether or not the case should proceed at all. It should. Like Vergara v. California before it, Wright v. New York forces a much needed examination about whether the state is delivering on its legal obligations. 

Battle lines drawn on annual testing in ESEA renewal
Education Week | Jan. 16, 2015
Thirteen years after mandating high-stakes testing, Congress is kicking off its most serious attempt yet to update the Elementary and Secondary Education Act with partisan wrangling over whether to ditch the law’s signature schedule of annual assessments. 

Conflict ahead over California school bonds
The Bond Buyer | Jan. 15, 2015
The budget proposal California Gov. Jerry Brown submitted last week is fueling a conflict over state bond funding for K-12 education. 

Governor’s proposed budget called “a gift” to adult education
EdSource | Jan. 15, 2015
The governor’s proposed budget, unveiled last week, allocates $500 million for an Adult Education Block Grant, with a provision that existing K-12 adult ed programs be funded for another year. 

This is what teachers think their tenure process should look like, poll shows
Huffington Post | Jan. 14, 2015
In the same week that a group of parents in New York are pushing a judge to hear a case that could limit teacher tenure, an education nonprofit has released a poll detailing what educators think their job protections should look like. 

CCSF wins reprieve: Shutdown averted with 2-year extension
San Francisco Chronicle | Jan. 14, 2015
The commission threatening to revoke City College of San Francisco’s accreditation has granted the school two additional years to bring its finances and governing structure into compliance with the group’s standards, its chairman said Wednesday. 

How to report test scores to parents debated
EdSource | Jan. 14, 2015
With California students set to begin taking new Smarter Balanced tests in the Common Core State Standards this spring, state education officials are worried about how parents will view the results – especially if, as experts predict, their kids’ initial scores will be low. 

Suspensions, expulsions down statewide
EdSource | Jan. 14, 2015
New state data show a steep drop in suspensions and expulsions of California students, continuing a recent downward trend. Altogether, 20 percent fewer students were expelled and 15 percent fewer students were suspended in 2013-14 than in the previous year. 

Accrediting panel gives City College of San Francisco a 2-year reprieve
LA Times | Jan. 14, 2015
San Francisco's only community college will remain accredited for at least two more years in a reprieve announced Wednesday to keep the institution's doors open for nearly 80,000 students. 

City College of San Francisco wins accreditation reprieve
Sacramento Bee | Jan. 14, 2015
Eighteen months after having its accreditation terminated, the City College of San Francisco has been granted restoration status by the regional accreditor and will have two more years to come into compliance with eligibility requirements. 

Restoration status approved for CCSF in quest to remain accredited
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 14, 2015
City College of San Francisco has been given two more years to reach full compliance with accrediting requirements, an accrediting body announced Wednesday. 

City College of San Francisco gets two more years to resolve accreditation issues
KQED | Jan. 14, 2015
The agency in charge of certifying the state’s junior and community colleges has given City College of San Francisco two more years to comply with eligibility standards. For now, that decision — made last week and announced Wednesday — effectively ends a shutdown threat that has hung over the school for more than two years. 

The nuts and bolts of Obama's community college plan
LA Times | Jan. 14, 2015
The rumors started early last week. President Obama had been outlining his goals for the last two years of his presidency and had long been interested in improving students' access to college. The president was scheduled to go to Knoxville, Tenn., on Friday. Observers connected the dots and speculated that he would announce a national version of the Volunteer State's program to guarantee high school graduates free tuition to community college.

Gov. Brown releases $164.7-billion budget plan, calls for restraint
LA Times | Friday, Jan. 9, 2015
Four days after taking the oath of office for the fourth time, Gov. Jerry Brown released his $164.7-billion budget proposal on Friday morning in the Capitol.

NCLB rewrite could target mandate on annual tests
Education Week | Jan. 9, 2015
For more than a decade, even amid big revisions to the original No Child Left Behind Act, one thing has remained constant: States have required students to take annual tests in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school.

Obama plan would make community colleges nearly free for millions
LA Times | Jan. 8, 2015
Aiming to dramatically expand access to higher education, President Obama on Thursday proposed making community college virtually free for millions of high school graduates — a potential boon for California's system, the largest in the nation.

Obama proposes free community college
EdSource | Jan. 8, 2015
President Barack Obama has unveiled a proposal to make the first two years of community college free for students who are diligent about working toward a degree.

Digital Library’s use, usefulness questioned
EdSource | Jan. 8, 2015
Midway through the school year, about half the state’s teachers have access to a new “Digital Library” the state purchased to help them teach the Common Core State Standards, but it’s unclear how many teachers are actually using it and how useful it is.

Accrediting commission to decide on restoration status for CCSF
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 7, 2015
The accrediting commission for City College of San Francisco will decide this week whether to grant the embattled school restoration status, a newly formed policy that would give the college two more years to meet accrediting requirements.

Report: State no longer at bottom in spending
EdSource | Jan. 7, 2015
Education Week’s annual state rankings on K-12 education had welcome, though outdated, news for California: No longer rock-bottom, California moved from 50th to 46th in per-student state spending in 2011-12, the latest data cited.

Will the court give Abood the boot?
City Journal | Jan. 7, 2015
Last year marked a legal turning point for California’s teachers’ unions and public employee unions across the nation. First, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Rolf M. Treu ruled in June that some of the teachers’ work rules—including tenure, seniority, and dismissal laws—violated the state and federal constitutions. 

CCSF not among California community colleges seeking four-year degree programs
San Francisco Examiner | Jan. 6, 2015
Nearly three dozen California community colleges have applied for a pilot program that would allow them to offer four-year degrees for the first time, but City College of San Francisco is not among them.

Brown: $65.7 billion for schools next year
EdSource | Jan. 5, 2015
In an inaugural address rooted in nostalgia but boasting ambitious goals for the future, Gov. Jerry Brown again identified education as a key focus – giving it top billing during remarks at his historic fourth swearing-in ceremony Monday and forecasting billions in additional school funding next year.

EdWatch 2015: 10 issues to watch
EdSource | Jan. 4, 2015
2015 promises to be a pivotal year for several major reforms in public education, including the continuing rollout of the Common Core State Standards, the implementation of the state’s new school financing and accountability system, and the administration of the online Smarter Balanced assessments to millions of students this spring. There will be other issues to watch. Here’s our list of the top 10. Let us know what you would have added.

California colleges see surge in efforts to unionize adjunct faculty
LA Times | Jan. 3, 2015
A wave of union organizing at college campuses across California and the nation in recent months is being fueled by part-time faculty who are increasingly discontented over working conditions and a lack of job security.

Student needs should trump interests of adults
U-T San Diego | Jan. 2, 2015
Few 2014 court decisions captured the nation’s attention like Vergara v. California. Educators, union leaders and community advocacy groups as well as legislators and parents nationwide waited anxiously to hear how Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Rolf M. Treu would rule on permanency, teacher dismissal and “first in, last out.”

A fresh approach to ranking states on education
Education Week | Jan. 2, 2015
The 19th annual edition of Education Week's Quality Counts takes a fresh approach to the state report card.

Teacher tenure, taxes on union executive’s 2015 agenda
Sacramento Bee | Dec. 25, 2014
The walls of Joe Nuñez’s second-floor office, a stone’s throw from the state Capitol, bear reprints of fruit- and vegetable-crate labels from California farms, colorful reminders of his humble roots as the son of south-state farmworkers.

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